The Skelton Brothers /// 280 /// 281

7 comments

  • Michelle
    Michelle N.Y.
    Responding to your Double Jeopardy question from Part 2. As a lawyer and prosecutor, I don't come across many double jeopardy issues in my day to day work. There is a Fifth Amendment protection against an individual being prosecuted for the same crime twice. For example, take a person who is charged with a robbery; the prosecutor takes the case to trial and defendant is acquitted. The prosecutor doesn't get a do-over; you can't put the same case with the same facts in front of a different jury to try to get a conviction. That's the basic rule. Bear in mind that I am not proficient in Michigan law, but in regard to the Skelton case, the elements of Kidnapping or Unlawful Imprisonment and Murder are going to be different, so I believe that he could be charged with murder, if there is enough evidence (and probable cause) for an arrest. Also bear in mind that the law always leaves a lot of room for interpretation, analysis and argument, so where we may want a cut and dry answer, there are arguments for and against the decision to charge that can be made, and it is up to a judge oftentimes to determine whether or not a case will be dismissed with prejudice (meaning its not allowed to be brought before the court again) and/or if there are limitations of what evidence from the prior case can be presented at the Murder trial.

    Responding to your Double Jeopardy question from Part 2. As a lawyer and prosecutor, I don't come across many double jeopardy issues in my day to day work. There is a Fifth Amendment protection against an individual being prosecuted for the same crime twice. For example, take a person who is charged with a robbery; the prosecutor takes the case to trial and defendant is acquitted. The prosecutor doesn't get a do-over; you can't put the same case with the same facts in front of a different jury to try to get a conviction. That's the basic rule.

    Bear in mind that I am not proficient in Michigan law, but in regard to the Skelton case, the elements of Kidnapping or Unlawful Imprisonment and Murder are going to be different, so I believe that he could be charged with murder, if there is enough evidence (and probable cause) for an arrest. Also bear in mind that the law always leaves a lot of room for interpretation, analysis and argument, so where we may want a cut and dry answer, there are arguments for and against the decision to charge that can be made, and it is up to a judge oftentimes to determine whether or not a case will be dismissed with prejudice (meaning its not allowed to be brought before the court again) and/or if there are limitations of what evidence from the prior case can be presented at the Murder trial.

  • True Crime Garage
    True Crime Garage
    Thank you Michelle for the insightful post. Something to chew on.... Cheers Nic

    Thank you Michelle for the insightful post. Something to chew on....
    Cheers Nic

  • Liz
    Liz Philladelphia
    It made me sad to hear the Captain say that because the father was suicidal, he could possibly be homicidal. I have been suicidal. I have never once wanted to hurt anyone but myself. I hope that people know that there is no correlation between depression/suicidal feelings and violence against others.

    It made me sad to hear the Captain say that because the father was suicidal, he could possibly be homicidal. I have been suicidal. I have never once wanted to hurt anyone but myself. I hope that people know that there is no correlation between depression/suicidal feelings and violence against others.

  • True Crime Garage
    True Crime Garage
    I agree Liz obviously two very, very different things. I have however seen a very obvious correlation in the opposite... many that have been homicidal can be Suicidal. Cheers and I hope all is well for you Liz. Nic

    I agree Liz obviously two very, very different things. I have however seen a very obvious correlation in the opposite... many that have been homicidal can be Suicidal.
    Cheers and I hope all is well for you Liz. Nic

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous
    Hey Nic! You make an excellent point; it is very true about homicidal people being suicidal. I am sorry I did not hear it that way while listening to the episode, but you are absolutely right. Thank you for your well wishes! I am absolutely in such a better place now. I am a testament to why our country needs mental health services to be readily available to children and teens. I am happy to say, I am a success story; I am sorry to say, not all people have the positive outcome that I did. Maybe if this father had gotten help like I did, his three boys would be living happy lives with their mother.

    Hey Nic!
    You make an excellent point; it is very true about homicidal people being suicidal. I am sorry I did not hear it that way while listening to the episode, but you are absolutely right.
    Thank you for your well wishes! I am absolutely in such a better place now. I am a testament to why our country needs mental health services to be readily available to children and teens. I am happy to say, I am a success story; I am sorry to say, not all people have the positive outcome that I did. Maybe if this father had gotten help like I did, his three boys would be living happy lives with their mother.

  • Nicholas
    Nicholas Missouri
    What a horrible case! It bears a great resemblance to the case of Sam and Lindsey Porter in the Kansas city area. The parents were separated, and Dan Porter picked the kids up in June 2004 and they subsequently disappeared. Their bodies were not immediately found, and Dan seemed to want to inflict maximum emotional damage on his ex-spouse by being coy and gamey in his remarks about what happened to the children. While he spent time in jail on a DUI charge that he got only a few days after the disappearance of the kids, he told multiple stories about the children: he said they were still alive, they were sent to live with others, and even said at one point he sold them to a pornography ring. The game playing stopped in 2008 when the children's bone were discovered in a shallow grave in a heavily wooded area near the Missouri River. Porter eventually plead guilty to murdering his children. It may take a similar discovery to get the truth from this father.

    What a horrible case! It bears a great resemblance to the case of Sam and Lindsey Porter in the Kansas city area. The parents were separated, and Dan Porter picked the kids up in June 2004 and they subsequently disappeared. Their bodies were not immediately found, and Dan seemed to want to inflict maximum emotional damage on his ex-spouse by being coy and gamey in his remarks about what happened to the children. While he spent time in jail on a DUI charge that he got only a few days after the disappearance of the kids, he told multiple stories about the children: he said they were still alive, they were sent to live with others, and even said at one point he sold them to a pornography ring. The game playing stopped in 2008 when the children's bone were discovered in a shallow grave in a heavily wooded area near the Missouri River. Porter eventually plead guilty to murdering his children. It may take a similar discovery to get the truth from this father.

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous New Hampshire
    What bothers me about the facebook post from the dad is he doesn't ask the boys for forgiveness. Wouldn't he want their forgiveness if they were still alive?

    What bothers me about the facebook post from the dad is he doesn't ask the boys for forgiveness. Wouldn't he want their forgiveness if they were still alive?

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