Brianna Maitland ///254 /// 255

22 comments

  • Bill

    Bill Victoria

    Please share the Emma fillipoff update. There is a ground campaign to raise money to search with a cadaver dog

    Please share the Emma fillipoff update. There is a ground campaign to raise money to search with a cadaver dog

  • Jen

    Jen Canada

    I feel like whenever a person goes missing or is murdered, and there is any history of drug use in their past or present, a lot of people immediately jump to the conclusion that drugs must have been involved. I grew up in the same sort of circles that Brianna seems to have, and I've seen plenty of shit go down. But I really don't buy the theory that she must have owed money to dealers and was therefore murdered. This just doesn't happen nearly as often as people think it does. If for some reason she had been allowed to rack up a big debt, which is unlikely, it far more possible that she would have been forced to 'work it off'. And I don't mean this in the usual 'sex trafficking ring' theory kind of way, more in that she would have been directly pimped out by her dealers. However, I don't believe this is the case because if she was together enough to hold down two jobs, then she seems unlikely to have been a hardcore crackhead or junkie. These people are not very good at employment. I also don't buy the theory that after leaving work, she decided to pull over in front of a creepy old house, tie off with a zip tie and get high. I've never heard of anyone ever using zip ties to tie off. You have to be able to untie once the drugs are in your system and zip ties don't come off that easily. As far as the idea that this group of people banded together, blocked the road and forced her out of her car...I don't see a motive. Fighting over a guy? That gives Keely LaCross a motive, but how many other people are going to be willing to participate based on that? A drug debt? Why would the dealers want to involve a bunch of other people? The idea that the lime wedge indicates that a party may have been happening in the farm house makes no sense. Who is going to be sitting in an abandoned house mixing drinks and cutting lime wedges? Did they bring little umbrellas too? Just my random thoughts. Great podcast.

    I feel like whenever a person goes missing or is murdered, and there is any history of drug use in their past or present, a lot of people immediately jump to the conclusion that drugs must have been involved. I grew up in the same sort of circles that Brianna seems to have, and I've seen plenty of shit go down. But I really don't buy the theory that she must have owed money to dealers and was therefore murdered. This just doesn't happen nearly as often as people think it does. If for some reason she had been allowed to rack up a big debt, which is unlikely, it far more possible that she would have been forced to 'work it off'. And I don't mean this in the usual 'sex trafficking ring' theory kind of way, more in that she would have been directly pimped out by her dealers. However, I don't believe this is the case because if she was together enough to hold down two jobs, then she seems unlikely to have been a hardcore crackhead or junkie. These people are not very good at employment.
    I also don't buy the theory that after leaving work, she decided to pull over in front of a creepy old house, tie off with a zip tie and get high. I've never heard of anyone ever using zip ties to tie off. You have to be able to untie once the drugs are in your system and zip ties don't come off that easily.
    As far as the idea that this group of people banded together, blocked the road and forced her out of her car...I don't see a motive. Fighting over a guy? That gives Keely LaCross a motive, but how many other people are going to be willing to participate based on that? A drug debt? Why would the dealers want to involve a bunch of other people?
    The idea that the lime wedge indicates that a party may have been happening in the farm house makes no sense. Who is going to be sitting in an abandoned house mixing drinks and cutting lime wedges? Did they bring little umbrellas too?
    Just my random thoughts. Great podcast.

  • Becky

    Becky Columbus, OH

    Thank you for covering this case. I lived in various towns in Northeastern and Central Vermont, as well as the Franconia area of New Hampshire, from 2003-2016. I've sometimes wondered if Brian Rooney, the man convicted of abducting and murdering UVM student Michelle Gardner-Quinn in Burlington, VT in October of 2006 could be ruled out definitively in either the Maura Murray or Brianna Maitland case. Admittedly, it seems like a very remote possibility, considering the far likelier drug connections in the Maitland case. Also, I wanted to share my experience on what it's like to live up there. The Captain's perspective on hitchhiking and 90 miles being a long distance is very similar to mine--I grew up in Central Ohio, too, and was shocked when I moved to Vermont that I had to drive so far to get anywhere. My family joked that it was a "Geographic Oddity" where we had to drive two hours just to get from one "large-ish" town to another. I knew many people who regularly commuted 40-60 miles one-way to work, and did that myself for some time. It is still fairly easy to get around the area hitchhiking, as well, and I would say, a little more common in Vermont than it is in Ohio. Because it's so rural, Vermont's public transit is very limited. My boyfriend used to hitch rides to work every day, and rarely hesitated to pick somebody up (this is NOT something we have in common!). I used to go on long walks and runs along the country roads, and motorists pulled over on multiple occasions to see if I needed a ride. It was also fairly common, in my experience, to see motorists stop to assist other drivers whose cars had spun out, or were disabled in some way, on the road. I think about this a lot when folks argue that Maura Murray would never have gotten into an unknown car, or been picked up by a stranger. I realize this is merely anecdotal and touches on relatively minor elements in the Maitland and Murray cases, but wanted to share a bit of the rural VT-NH experience. As always, it's a pleasure to listen and think along with you guys.

    Thank you for covering this case. I lived in various towns in Northeastern and Central Vermont, as well as the Franconia area of New Hampshire, from 2003-2016. I've sometimes wondered if Brian Rooney, the man convicted of abducting and murdering UVM student Michelle Gardner-Quinn in Burlington, VT in October of 2006 could be ruled out definitively in either the Maura Murray or Brianna Maitland case. Admittedly, it seems like a very remote possibility, considering the far likelier drug connections in the Maitland case. Also, I wanted to share my experience on what it's like to live up there. The Captain's perspective on hitchhiking and 90 miles being a long distance is very similar to mine--I grew up in Central Ohio, too, and was shocked when I moved to Vermont that I had to drive so far to get anywhere. My family joked that it was a "Geographic Oddity" where we had to drive two hours just to get from one "large-ish" town to another. I knew many people who regularly commuted 40-60 miles one-way to work, and did that myself for some time. It is still fairly easy to get around the area hitchhiking, as well, and I would say, a little more common in Vermont than it is in Ohio. Because it's so rural, Vermont's public transit is very limited. My boyfriend used to hitch rides to work every day, and rarely hesitated to pick somebody up (this is NOT something we have in common!). I used to go on long walks and runs along the country roads, and motorists pulled over on multiple occasions to see if I needed a ride. It was also fairly common, in my experience, to see motorists stop to assist other drivers whose cars had spun out, or were disabled in some way, on the road. I think about this a lot when folks argue that Maura Murray would never have gotten into an unknown car, or been picked up by a stranger. I realize this is merely anecdotal and touches on relatively minor elements in the Maitland and Murray cases, but wanted to share a bit of the rural VT-NH experience. As always, it's a pleasure to listen and think along with you guys.

  • Josh

    Josh Minnesota

    So my thoughts on the odd position of the car are thus. There was a dirt road across from the barn. I think she left work and thought someone was following her/chasing her. Probably the same person/paranoia that spooked her earlier that day. Anyway so she is driving away from work and guns it. The cuts the lights and turns down that dirt road to stop and hope the person drives past. But the person going past maybe notices and and stops their car and starts approaching her car. She throws it in reverse to GTFO and hits the barn going 25 or whatever. Had to be going at least a little fast to end up like that. So then she is either under the influence and paranoid and wanders off, or there really was someone chasing her, and this is where they got her. I agree on not giving the police to hard a time other than after the tow they have to call the owner. But that might be on the tow/impound, not the police themselves.

    So my thoughts on the odd position of the car are thus. There was a dirt road across from the barn. I think she left work and thought someone was following her/chasing her. Probably the same person/paranoia that spooked her earlier that day.

    Anyway so she is driving away from work and guns it. The cuts the lights and turns down that dirt road to stop and hope the person drives past. But the person going past maybe notices and and stops their car and starts approaching her car. She throws it in reverse to GTFO and hits the barn going 25 or whatever. Had to be going at least a little fast to end up like that.

    So then she is either under the influence and paranoid and wanders off, or there really was someone chasing her, and this is where they got her.

    I agree on not giving the police to hard a time other than after the tow they have to call the owner. But that might be on the tow/impound, not the police themselves.

  • L. Neely

    L. Neely Cali

    I feel it's related to her assault.

    I feel it's related to her assault.

  • Scott

    Scott Great state of Texas

    I believe she met with someone or perhaps someone got into her vehicle after she left the restaurant. Someone she knew. I believe that she and this unknown person parked the car at the barn, A fight ensued and in the process the car was knocked out of gear or perhaps she took it out of gear and the vehicle went backwards as she hit the extracellular in the scuffle causing the vehicle to hit the barn, You can plainly see that the vehicles tire in lifted a little bit so the tire can not make enough contact with the ground to make the vehicle go as that is the wheel that has the power to it since it is a rear wheel drive, I do believe it was probably a drug deal gone bad given her history, I do not know the girl so I may be off base when I say this . It would not surprise me if she sold drugs to supply her habit, I do believe that people have been killed for a lot less that $100 worth of pot, Dis she deserve NO by no means. Just a theory of mine that is all. I don't want it to seem like I am trashing the girl because I am not but it seems as though she hung around a pretty rough crowd. Oh and by the way it is not always easy for law enforcement to find a registered owner of a vehicle. Did the officer try real hard no but I am sure he has worked plenty of accident where people had left the scene because they were drunk or no insurance or other legal reasons. People move from the address on the registration, they have sold the vehicle and the person who bought it never registered the vehicle most people don't have land lines any more so you cant look them up in the phoe book, So you tow the vehicle and have tow company put a hold on the vehicle if the owner comes to pick it up. So the officer can investigate the accident since the barn was damaged. I am by no means being critical of the captain because Your show is probably my favorite. Keep up the good work. Scott

    I believe she met with someone or perhaps someone got into her vehicle after she left the restaurant. Someone she knew. I believe that she and this unknown person parked the car at the barn, A fight ensued and in the process the car was knocked out of gear or perhaps she took it out of gear and the vehicle went backwards as she hit the extracellular in the scuffle causing the vehicle to hit the barn, You can plainly see that the vehicles tire in lifted a little bit so the tire can not make enough contact with the ground to make the vehicle go as that is the wheel that has the power to it since it is a rear wheel drive, I do believe it was probably a drug deal gone bad given her history, I do not know the girl so I may be off base when I say this . It would not surprise me if she sold drugs to supply her habit, I do believe that people have been killed for a lot less that $100 worth of pot, Dis she deserve NO by no means. Just a theory of mine that is all. I don't want it to seem like I am trashing the girl because I am not but it seems as though she hung around a pretty rough crowd. Oh and by the way it is not always easy for law enforcement to find a registered owner of a vehicle. Did the officer try real hard no but I am sure he has worked plenty of accident where people had left the scene because they were drunk or no insurance or other legal reasons. People move from the address on the registration, they have sold the vehicle and the person who bought it never registered the vehicle most people don't have land lines any more so you cant look them up in the phoe book, So you tow the vehicle and have tow company put a hold on the vehicle if the owner comes to pick it up. So the officer can investigate the accident since the barn was damaged. I am by no means being critical of the captain because Your show is probably my favorite. Keep up the good work. Scott

  • Claire

    Claire Ireland

    The theory that she was in debt and drug dealers and they murdered her isn't a good one. Usually they wouldn't hide the body because in cases where someone owes dealers money they want the body to be found to 'send a message' to others not to cross them. The other thing is if she owed them loads of money it would make sense that they'd want her to pay it back, and that could involve extortion (making what is owed more and more, and possibly threatening to call into her place of work) or even forcing her to sell drugs to pay them off. I was tormented by some girls when I was in school. I remember running into them in the mall by accident one weekend and they scared the crap out of me. It's much more likely when her mother spoke about her being out of sorts in the mall carpark it was because she bumped into those girls in the mall... Is it at all possible that her car was put at the abandoned house after someone used it to dispose of her?. Did they use cadaver dogs on the car? I know it's a missing persons case, I'm just wondering if it's still possible if she's alive?.

    The theory that she was in debt and drug dealers and they murdered her isn't a good one. Usually they wouldn't hide the body because in cases where someone owes dealers money they want the body to be found to 'send a message' to others not to cross them. The other thing is if she owed them loads of money it would make sense that they'd want her to pay it back, and that could involve extortion (making what is owed more and more, and possibly threatening to call into her place of work) or even forcing her to sell drugs to pay them off.

    I was tormented by some girls when I was in school. I remember running into them in the mall by accident one weekend and they scared the crap out of me. It's much more likely when her mother spoke about her being out of sorts in the mall carpark it was because she bumped into those girls in the mall...

    Is it at all possible that her car was put at the abandoned house after someone used it to dispose of her?. Did they use cadaver dogs on the car? I know it's a missing persons case, I'm just wondering if it's still possible if she's alive?.

  • JC

    JC Raleigh

    What evidence is there that she ever left work? How close was her boss looked into for the disappearance? If she left at close around Midnight and only one or two employees can confirm this, whose to say she ever really left. Say she was told not to go to work because someone found out the manager that gave her the job was tired of her saying no. They're closing up shop together an accident happens, and the manager goes into cover up mode. The barn is not far away from work. Body is hidden in the kitchen, and the manager drives the car down the road to hide it behind the barn. In his rush he crashes the car trying to back around it. The manager then hikes back to work and takes the body away in his car. Who were the witnesses that saw her leave work? If it was only the boss or one other employee I have questions, if it was someone else, what did they see? Did they just see the car drive away and assume it was her or did they see her behind the wheel. Not to mention she could have forgotten something and come back to work. If she comes back and everyone but the boss is now gone, you now have opportunity.

    What evidence is there that she ever left work? How close was her boss looked into for the disappearance? If she left at close around Midnight and only one or two employees can confirm this, whose to say she ever really left. Say she was told not to go to work because someone found out the manager that gave her the job was tired of her saying no. They're closing up shop together an accident happens, and the manager goes into cover up mode. The barn is not far away from work. Body is hidden in the kitchen, and the manager drives the car down the road to hide it behind the barn. In his rush he crashes the car trying to back around it. The manager then hikes back to work and takes the body away in his car. Who were the witnesses that saw her leave work? If it was only the boss or one other employee I have questions, if it was someone else, what did they see? Did they just see the car drive away and assume it was her or did they see her behind the wheel. Not to mention she could have forgotten something and come back to work. If she comes back and everyone but the boss is now gone, you now have opportunity.

  • jody

    jody Missouri

    The scene with Brianna's car in the barn for this case, it could be the beginning to a Tarantino movie . After that scene, cut to Brianna getting ready for work... I would be interested in know if the tow truck driver could tell if the car was on the foundation, it really looks like it is in the photos. I also wonder if the PRND21 on the column/dash was working. I had a car once that the arrow didn't match the what the car was in. Could she or someone who was with her been parked, thought the car was in Park when it was actually in Reverse, revved the engine to get a little more heat sending the car into the barn?

    The scene with Brianna's car in the barn for this case, it could be the beginning to a Tarantino movie . After that scene, cut to Brianna getting ready for work...
    I would be interested in know if the tow truck driver could tell if the car was on the foundation, it really looks like it is in the photos. I also wonder if the PRND21 on the column/dash was working. I had a car once that the arrow didn't match the what the car was in. Could she or someone who was with her been parked, thought the car was in Park when it was actually in Reverse, revved the engine to get a little more heat sending the car into the barn?

  • Louise H

    Louise H Michigan

    I'm glad you guys covered this old case though there isn't much to go on. My impression is that this might be similar to the Rachel Burkheimer case . True Crime Daily has a good episode of that one on Youtube. In a nutshell, she was involved with people who were big druggies, they turned on her after thinking she was a snitch, and killed her. The idea that she encountered a killer on the road is just so remote, like you guys said. I hope they use the DNA evidence and make some progress or put the squeeze on certain people.

    I'm glad you guys covered this old case though there isn't much to go on. My impression is that this might be similar to the Rachel Burkheimer case . True Crime Daily has a good episode of that one on Youtube. In a nutshell, she was involved with people who were big druggies, they turned on her after thinking she was a snitch, and killed her. The idea that she encountered a killer on the road is just so remote, like you guys said. I hope they use the DNA evidence and make some progress or put the squeeze on certain people.

  • Jeff

    Jeff Georgia

    How do you propose the cop or the tow company get the contact number for the registered owner?

    How do you propose the cop or the tow company get the contact number for the registered owner?

  • Jeff

    Jeff Georgia

    Let's be clear, she absolutely wasn't a crackhead. Crackheads don't hold down 2 jobs. Doesn't mean she wasn't casually using any hard drugs, but not many casual users of crack. Her 2 jobs wouldn't support a crack habit anyway. Females have a much easier way of getting crack than money. It's an unfortunate reality. But she wasn't doing that either or she wouldn't have bothered with 1 job, much less 2.

    Let's be clear, she absolutely wasn't a crackhead. Crackheads don't hold down 2 jobs. Doesn't mean she wasn't casually using any hard drugs, but not many casual users of crack. Her 2 jobs wouldn't support a crack habit anyway. Females have a much easier way of getting crack than money. It's an unfortunate reality. But she wasn't doing that either or she wouldn't have bothered with 1 job, much less 2.

  • Spokane resident

    Spokane resident Spokane WA

    Hard to believe but we just had a murder in our city over a $20 meth drug deal

    Hard to believe but we just had a murder in our city over a $20 meth drug deal

  • Steph

    Steph Florida

    The pictures of the vehicle are intriguing. It seems a simple explanation would make the best sense. Maybe she crashed it herself accidentally and because it was cold and dark, she then caught a ride with a passerby who saw how alone she was, and how easy it would be to just snatch her and do whatever they wanted. A crime of opportunity.

    The pictures of the vehicle are intriguing. It seems a simple explanation would make the best sense. Maybe she crashed it herself accidentally and because it was cold and dark, she then caught a ride with a passerby who saw how alone she was, and how easy it would be to just snatch her and do whatever they wanted. A crime of opportunity.

  • True Crime Garage

    True Crime Garage

    It's my understanding that it is the tow company's responsibility to notify the vehicle owner once they have possession of the vehicle. This would be a letter mailed to the vehicle owner's home. Police have more important things to do than track down an owner of a what most of the time is simply an abandoned vehicle. Cheers Nic

    It's my understanding that it is the tow company's responsibility to notify the vehicle owner once they have possession of the vehicle. This would be a letter mailed to the vehicle owner's home. Police have more important things to do than track down an owner of a what most of the time is simply an abandoned vehicle.
    Cheers Nic

  • Naptime Nancy Drew

    Naptime Nancy Drew Portland, OR

    The ex boyfriend admitted to seeing her car like that and still drove past...I don’t know. Having a hard time with that one, regardless if he was afraid of appearing inebriated. How many witnesses saw him at this party? The drug house that had their house searched and then left town shortly after...I hope they’re being monitored wherever they’re at. The lime on the car seems like a nod to the bar. So that’s confusing. Was it ever tested for DNA? Doubt it considering the lack of severity the accident originally appeared to passer bys and police, but you’d think that would’ve been important. Did police identify the owner of the gun and drugs inside the home? Was there access inside the home aside from the door that Brianna’s car was backed into? I think it’s possible she wrecked the car into the house and then tried to hitchhike back home. That’s also why I still question the ex boyfriend.

    The ex boyfriend admitted to seeing her car like that and still drove past...I don’t know. Having a hard time with that one, regardless if he was afraid of appearing inebriated. How many witnesses saw him at this party?

    The drug house that had their house searched and then left town shortly after...I hope they’re being monitored wherever they’re at.

    The lime on the car seems like a nod to the bar. So that’s confusing. Was it ever tested for DNA? Doubt it considering the lack of severity the accident originally appeared to passer bys and police, but you’d think that would’ve been important.

    Did police identify the owner of the gun and drugs inside the home?

    Was there access inside the home aside from the door that Brianna’s car was backed into?

    I think it’s possible she wrecked the car into the house and then tried to hitchhike back home. That’s also why I still question the ex boyfriend.

  • EF

    EF VT

    I grew up in the big city of Burlington, VT (big for this state!) and have followed Brianna's case closely. In a state like Vermont, where so many of us are interconnected somehow, things like this really feel like they are happening to all of us. I wanted to expand on what Becky from Ohio said by saying that it is not at all weird for people in rural areas in Vermont to hang out with people who live even an hour away...you sometimes have to go really far to find someone who you like, because it can be really slim pickings in the low population areas -even in Burlington, we would always be on the lookout for transplants from elsewhere, because otherwise you'd be stuck dating people you'd known FOREVER. For example: my partner dated a girl in high school who lived 45 minutes away, and I dated a guy who lived an hour away, and then those two people we dated ended up dating each other even though they also lived an hour away from each other in another direction. This is not at all weird in Vermont. I can't remember why exactly both Becky and I wanted to point this out, but there was something in the episode that someone said about it being unlikely to involve people from other communities, or something like that, and I just want to say that communities in Vermont go far beyond individual small towns. It's more regional. I really hope that Brianna's family gets some justice on this one. I suspect it's as simple as an accidental death from group partying that some unsavory folks covered up out of fear for their own butts. But her family and friends deserve to know. God, we used to do the most dangerous partying when I was a kid, and the rural kids were 5 times worse.....nothing to do out there.

    I grew up in the big city of Burlington, VT (big for this state!) and have followed Brianna's case closely. In a state like Vermont, where so many of us are interconnected somehow, things like this really feel like they are happening to all of us. I wanted to expand on what Becky from Ohio said by saying that it is not at all weird for people in rural areas in Vermont to hang out with people who live even an hour away...you sometimes have to go really far to find someone who you like, because it can be really slim pickings in the low population areas -even in Burlington, we would always be on the lookout for transplants from elsewhere, because otherwise you'd be stuck dating people you'd known FOREVER. For example: my partner dated a girl in high school who lived 45 minutes away, and I dated a guy who lived an hour away, and then those two people we dated ended up dating each other even though they also lived an hour away from each other in another direction. This is not at all weird in Vermont. I can't remember why exactly both Becky and I wanted to point this out, but there was something in the episode that someone said about it being unlikely to involve people from other communities, or something like that, and I just want to say that communities in Vermont go far beyond individual small towns. It's more regional.
    I really hope that Brianna's family gets some justice on this one. I suspect it's as simple as an accidental death from group partying that some unsavory folks covered up out of fear for their own butts. But her family and friends deserve to know. God, we used to do the most dangerous partying when I was a kid, and the rural kids were 5 times worse.....nothing to do out there.

  • Lauren Abramowitz

    Lauren Abramowitz San Francisco, CA

    A few thoughts on the Part 1 episode: +It was stated Kellie Maitland had a strained relationship with her daughter in the episode. This not something that has previously been reported. I challenge that based on my research to date. Briana moved out of her parents house because she was seeking more independence. She lived on a rural farm on the Canadian border. They lived "off the grid." She could shoot skeet and drive an ATV. She reportedly did not fit in at the first high school (MVU) and wanted to go to Enosburg High School where she had friends and fit in. In order to go to Enosburg, she had to live in the district. As a rural teen myself, I assure you the yearning for something bigger in the 1990s and early 2000s was very common. +Too much time was spent on the Vermont State Police (VSP). The VSP screwed up and they outright have admitted this to the Maitland family and have since worked with the family closely. End of story, not worth spending anymore time on it than that. +Too much time spent on the specifics of the car, e.g. more than two minutes on the keys not being with Brianna's car. The key item there is that the keys were missing. + Rural VT and most of Appalachia then and even in some areas still now, do not lock their cars and homes. It is cultural. Even if you disagree, referring to someone by a term used for those living with mental illness is irresponsible journalism. +Jillian Stout did not call the Maitlands and "Ask for her." Jillian called and asked if Kellie had seen Brianna since she had not since she returned home to her dad's. +It had never been reported as far as I have heard previously that Briana reported she was taking an upcoming trip to a co-worker. It is correct that as youthful teenage, Briana longed to visit/move to larger cities in the United States and Canada. Where did you obtain this information? +There were not 1000s of people missing from Franklin County, VT as the Captain suggested. Since missing people have been formally tracked in the United States, we can confirm this. NAMEUS and the VSP report missing cases which are easy to access and the numbers are extremely low. +I believe James reported that the lights were no longer on when he happened upon it. There is a lot of questions around when James saw the car, what he was doing prior and some information that has not been made available to the public. Do not read this to mean that James is a primary suspect, just that there may be more information about his observations. +It is believed that Brianna was not the last to drive the car because the driver's seat was all the way back. Brianna was 5'4. Further, the private investigator hired by Bruce and Kellie has a credible source that reports Brianna was taken from the car by "the tall guy." +Keallie Lacross was not with her cousin when the altercation occurred. No selfie was taken. The photo that is available was taken at the hospital for the purposes of filing charges. Keallie is a red herring in this case and she has not been cleared. She is still a suspect, per Keallie herself, in a recent interview. The VSP offered her a plea when she was facing federal charges for drug distribution and she did not accept it, reporting she did not have the information. Keallie was also a 17 year old at the time Brianna went missing. It would seem unlikely that she could coordinate such a master plan to abduct and/or kill Brianna at 17. I do believe there were locals involved in the disappearance but I believe they were male and are linked to another case in Vermont of a teenage male. +You are correct, Keallie recently confirmed for another podcast that the fight was over James. They were both involved with him, in some manner. +The Captain's comment on "that's what she said" was juvenile and offensive. +The comment by the Captain about people not locking their doors as "maniac" was rude. EF, if you see this - do you have any information on the Ligia Collins case in Burlington in July 2004? I have been searching for more information on Ligia specifically. She had two children, were either of them with Ryans?

    A few thoughts on the Part 1 episode:
    +It was stated Kellie Maitland had a strained relationship with her daughter in the episode. This not something that has previously been reported. I challenge that based on my research to date. Briana moved out of her parents house because she was seeking more independence. She lived on a rural farm on the Canadian border. They lived "off the grid." She could shoot skeet and drive an ATV. She reportedly did not fit in at the first high school (MVU) and wanted to go to Enosburg High School where she had friends and fit in. In order to go to Enosburg, she had to live in the district. As a rural teen myself, I assure you the yearning for something bigger in the 1990s and early 2000s was very common.
    +Too much time was spent on the Vermont State Police (VSP). The VSP screwed up and they outright have admitted this to the Maitland family and have since worked with the family closely. End of story, not worth spending anymore time on it than that.
    +Too much time spent on the specifics of the car, e.g. more than two minutes on the keys not being with Brianna's car. The key item there is that the keys were missing.
    + Rural VT and most of Appalachia then and even in some areas still now, do not lock their cars and homes. It is cultural. Even if you disagree, referring to someone by a term used for those living with mental illness is irresponsible journalism.
    +Jillian Stout did not call the Maitlands and "Ask for her." Jillian called and asked if Kellie had seen Brianna since she had not since she returned home to her dad's.
    +It had never been reported as far as I have heard previously that Briana reported she was taking an upcoming trip to a co-worker. It is correct that as youthful teenage, Briana longed to visit/move to larger cities in the United States and Canada. Where did you obtain this information?
    +There were not 1000s of people missing from Franklin County, VT as the Captain suggested. Since missing people have been formally tracked in the United States, we can confirm this. NAMEUS and the VSP report missing cases which are easy to access and the numbers are extremely low.
    +I believe James reported that the lights were no longer on when he happened upon it. There is a lot of questions around when James saw the car, what he was doing prior and some information that has not been made available to the public. Do not read this to mean that James is a primary suspect, just that there may be more information about his observations.
    +It is believed that Brianna was not the last to drive the car because the driver's seat was all the way back. Brianna was 5'4. Further, the private investigator hired by Bruce and Kellie has a credible source that reports Brianna was taken from the car by "the tall guy."
    +Keallie Lacross was not with her cousin when the altercation occurred. No selfie was taken. The photo that is available was taken at the hospital for the purposes of filing charges. Keallie is a red herring in this case and she has not been cleared. She is still a suspect, per Keallie herself, in a recent interview. The VSP offered her a plea when she was facing federal charges for drug distribution and she did not accept it, reporting she did not have the information. Keallie was also a 17 year old at the time Brianna went missing. It would seem unlikely that she could coordinate such a master plan to abduct and/or kill Brianna at 17. I do believe there were locals involved in the disappearance but I believe they were male and are linked to another case in Vermont of a teenage male.
    +You are correct, Keallie recently confirmed for another podcast that the fight was over James. They were both involved with him, in some manner.

    +The Captain's comment on "that's what she said" was juvenile and offensive.
    +The comment by the Captain about people not locking their doors as "maniac" was rude.

    EF, if you see this - do you have any information on the Ligia Collins case in Burlington in July 2004? I have been searching for more information on Ligia specifically. She had two children, were either of them with Ryans?

  • Lauren Abramowitz

    Lauren Abramowitz San Francisco, CA

    More on Part 1: + The "life back together" comment I suspect was with regard to dropping out of two high schools, so taking the GED and finding a more stable place to live than moving from home to home. It's a red herring. +The lime on the back of the car is a red herring. It is believed to have fallen onto the car at her place of work. Part 2: +The two jobs to support a drug habit, does not seem logical. There were uncashed checks in the car when it was found. +Brianna admitted to friends herself that she had experimented with drugs. The private investigator hired by the Maitlands said on another podcast she was doing more drugs than her parents realized but she was not a heavy user or addict. +There is a lot of chatter around the drug debt. Ramon Ryans and Nathaniel Jackson were known drug dealers in the area. Jackson had a child with the woman found in the Berkshire, VT home that was raided upon the rumor that Brianna was in the basement. Thus, Ryans and Soto had no reason for being in the area other than selling drugs. All three have been to prison since Brianna went missing. +Ryans walked away from federal charges on a drug charge after he agreed to provide what information he had on Brianna. All that the public knows about such is the VSP has said the information put them on the right track. +Ryans is linked to the death of Ligia Collins in Burlington, VT. Collins was his then girlfriend with whom he lived. +Correction, not all reported to knowing Brianna in the Berkshire, VT house. +MJA Investigations' information should be taken with a grain of salt. Mark Harper has consistently held himself out to be a PI in the state of VT, despite not having a license for such.

    More on Part 1:

    + The "life back together" comment I suspect was with regard to dropping out of two high schools, so taking the GED and finding a more stable place to live than moving from home to home. It's a red herring.
    +The lime on the back of the car is a red herring. It is believed to have fallen onto the car at her place of work.

    Part 2:

    +The two jobs to support a drug habit, does not seem logical. There were uncashed checks in the car when it was found.
    +Brianna admitted to friends herself that she had experimented with drugs. The private investigator hired by the Maitlands said on another podcast she was doing more drugs than her parents realized but she was not a heavy user or addict.
    +There is a lot of chatter around the drug debt. Ramon Ryans and Nathaniel Jackson were known drug dealers in the area. Jackson had a child with the woman found in the Berkshire, VT home that was raided upon the rumor that Brianna was in the basement. Thus, Ryans and Soto had no reason for being in the area other than selling drugs. All three have been to prison since Brianna went missing. +Ryans walked away from federal charges on a drug charge after he agreed to provide what information he had on Brianna. All that the public knows about such is the VSP has said the information put them on the right track.
    +Ryans is linked to the death of Ligia Collins in Burlington, VT. Collins was his then girlfriend with whom he lived.
    +Correction, not all reported to knowing Brianna in the Berkshire, VT house.
    +MJA Investigations' information should be taken with a grain of salt. Mark Harper has consistently held himself out to be a PI in the state of VT, despite not having a license for such.

  • True Crime Garage

    True Crime Garage

    Thank you for the thoughts and feedback Lauren - Cheers Nic

    Thank you for the thoughts and feedback Lauren - Cheers Nic

  • mG

    mG tX

    I feel a lot of cases go unsolved, because early on, the police are busy not getting busy on the case. "She probably ran away....she is just left town..." Here is an idea, instead of sitting around the police station eating doughnuts, investigate while the crime and scene are fresh.

    I feel a lot of cases go unsolved, because early on, the police are busy not getting busy on the case. "She probably ran away....she is just left town..." Here is an idea, instead of sitting around the police station eating doughnuts, investigate while the crime and scene are fresh.

  • Adriana

    Adriana CT

    I was shocked that you guys hadn't mentioned that potentially she had pulled over on the side of the road and saw something/someone in her rearview mirror and the only way she thought that she could get away was by throwing the car into reverse and hoping that she hit whomever or whatever was potentially there. Then once she thought that perhaps she scared whatever it was away, tried to get her car in drive but unfortunately it was up on the foundation and she had no where to go, essentially a sitting duck.

    I was shocked that you guys hadn't mentioned that potentially she had pulled over on the side of the road and saw something/someone in her rearview mirror and the only way she thought that she could get away was by throwing the car into reverse and hoping that she hit whomever or whatever was potentially there. Then once she thought that perhaps she scared whatever it was away, tried to get her car in drive but unfortunately it was up on the foundation and she had no where to go, essentially a sitting duck.

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