Melissa Witt /// 161 /// 162

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

www.whokilledmissywitt.com

23 comments

  • Leesa

    Leesa Chicago

    Listening to the podcast now. :) First thing on the phone call where the grandma wanted the grandson to tell the police what he found. It doesn't sound like the grandson had any involvement. To me, it sounds like he just wanted the body to be found, but did not want to get involved, so he moved the body out of remorse, so it was found quicker. Many people do not want to be involved with criminal cases, understandably. Second, why do people believe this person had to have a reason for this drop off place? Choosing a location close to you only makes it more likely you'll get caught. Choosing a place you know well and have been a lot means more likely to get caught. A smart killer, which is what this person is since they haven't been caught, would choose a place farther away, completely remote and unknown, and where they have no personal connection. If it IS a person from the area, what about the people who found the body? The drive it every day. They're very familiar. Start asking them questions. Taking all her belongings isn't weird either. Either he kept her locked away for days and all her stuff would be left at that location or he took her directly to this site and her belongings were left in the car. He likely got rid of them after that. Raping someone in winter outside really isn't unheard of. Rape isn't a crime of convenience. It's a crime of power. To me, it sounds like someone who knows her or has seen her before. Not saying I'm right, but had to question those thoughts that came up. Just thinking here. :)

    Listening to the podcast now. smile

    First thing on the phone call where the grandma wanted the grandson to tell the police what he found. It doesn't sound like the grandson had any involvement. To me, it sounds like he just wanted the body to be found, but did not want to get involved, so he moved the body out of remorse, so it was found quicker. Many people do not want to be involved with criminal cases, understandably.

    Second, why do people believe this person had to have a reason for this drop off place? Choosing a location close to you only makes it more likely you'll get caught. Choosing a place you know well and have been a lot means more likely to get caught. A smart killer, which is what this person is since they haven't been caught, would choose a place farther away, completely remote and unknown, and where they have no personal connection. If it IS a person from the area, what about the people who found the body? The drive it every day. They're very familiar. Start asking them questions.

    Taking all her belongings isn't weird either. Either he kept her locked away for days and all her stuff would be left at that location or he took her directly to this site and her belongings were left in the car. He likely got rid of them after that. Raping someone in winter outside really isn't unheard of. Rape isn't a crime of convenience. It's a crime of power.

    To me, it sounds like someone who knows her or has seen her before. Not saying I'm right, but had to question those thoughts that came up. Just thinking here. smile

  • Ben

    Ben

    @Leesa Interesting points, and I agree with most of what you say. Murderers/rapists do choose places or areas that they are familiar with though. There are many reasons for this. They know exactly where to go, and more importantly, how to get away. Familiarity breeds confidence. I agree that this means they are possibly more likely to get caught eventually due to the fact that law enforcement will be looking locally, at least to start with, but they have to try to be in control, so they choose a location of which they have plenty of knowledge. I agree with you about Grandma’s phone call and that the murderer knew Missy, even if she didn’t know him. These cases are always so sad due to the lack of real answers. I believe the second suspect mentioned is the most likely killer and hopefully the family and loved ones get some answers before he is executed.

    @Leesa

    Interesting points, and I agree with most of what you say. Murderers/rapists do choose places or areas that they are familiar with though. There are many reasons for this. They know exactly where to go, and more importantly, how to get away. Familiarity breeds confidence. I agree that this means they are possibly more likely to get caught eventually due to the fact that law enforcement will be looking locally, at least to start with, but they have to try to be in control, so they choose a location of which they have plenty of knowledge.

    I agree with you about Grandma’s phone call and that the murderer knew Missy, even if she didn’t know him. These cases are always so sad due to the lack of real answers. I believe the second suspect mentioned is the most likely killer and hopefully the family and loved ones get some answers before he is executed.

  • Whitney

    Whitney Arkansas

    I agree with Leesa about moving the body. There are a lot of people in rural Arkansas who are deeply suspicious (with or without reason) of law enforcement. There could be multiple reasons for the grandson not wanting to talk to police (could have warrants out, could have been illegally hunting, etc), so he instead moved the body so that someone else would find it. I think getting too hung up on the body being moved is simply a distraction. I also wonder about whether this was someone Missy knew or not. Isn't it possible that the killer was simply looking for a victim...if he knew it was ladies' league night, he might have just parked himself at the bowling alley and waited for an opportunity/appealing victim, because he knew a lot of women would be coming in and out of the bowling alley that night.

    I agree with Leesa about moving the body. There are a lot of people in rural Arkansas who are deeply suspicious (with or without reason) of law enforcement. There could be multiple reasons for the grandson not wanting to talk to police (could have warrants out, could have been illegally hunting, etc), so he instead moved the body so that someone else would find it. I think getting too hung up on the body being moved is simply a distraction.

    I also wonder about whether this was someone Missy knew or not. Isn't it possible that the killer was simply looking for a victim...if he knew it was ladies' league night, he might have just parked himself at the bowling alley and waited for an opportunity/appealing victim, because he knew a lot of women would be coming in and out of the bowling alley that night.

  • Leesa

    Leesa Chicago

    Hi Ben, I completely understand why killers choose locations familiar to them. What I meant by my comments though is that essentially a smart killer would not because a smart killer would know they'd be more likely to get caught that way. This person is clearly somewhat smart because they haven't been caught yet. Although killers often drop bodies off in locations they know well, it isn't always the case. I'm just trying to emphasize that the investigaters shouldn't harp on this and let the location contain their search and they should widen their scope. It could help them. I wouldn't want to see an investigation hindered because they think the killer absolutely 100% knew the area. If it's a big rock, it might have just stuck out to them. It just seemed like she was SO obsessed with focusing on the location. :/

    Hi Ben,

    I completely understand why killers choose locations familiar to them. What I meant by my comments though is that essentially a smart killer would not because a smart killer would know they'd be more likely to get caught that way. This person is clearly somewhat smart because they haven't been caught yet. Although killers often drop bodies off in locations they know well, it isn't always the case. I'm just trying to emphasize that the investigaters shouldn't harp on this and let the location contain their search and they should widen their scope. It could help them. I wouldn't want to see an investigation hindered because they think the killer absolutely 100% knew the area. If it's a big rock, it might have just stuck out to them. It just seemed like she was SO obsessed with focusing on the location. :/

  • Tracy

    Tracy Indianapolis

    I have a difference of opinion here... which is unusual because I usually agree with the guys here. I find it hard to believe this guy did it. There seems to be a lot of circumstantial evidence pointing towards this guy... but let me say this. This guy was had a pot grow near the location where the body was found. The podcast never stated if he had an active grow at the time... BUT If This was his super secret grow area... there is NO WAY he'd take a body there knowing police would eventually find the body and his plants. He's going to go out of his way to keep that location secret. I just think he'd put the body somewhere else if he did it.

    I have a difference of opinion here... which is unusual because I usually agree with the guys here. I find it hard to believe this guy did it. There seems to be a lot of circumstantial evidence pointing towards this guy... but let me say this. This guy was had a pot grow near the location where the body was found. The podcast never stated if he had an active grow at the time... BUT If This was his super secret grow area... there is NO WAY he'd take a body there knowing police would eventually find the body and his plants. He's going to go out of his way to keep that location secret. I just think he'd put the body somewhere else if he did it.

  • Kelly

    Kelly Los Angeles, CA

    I would honestly prefer just hearing the entire breakdown of the case by Nic and the Captain. The lady they had on the show appeared to have detailed info but she has her own motivations here, which include her documentary. I hope it helps the case but I would still prefer info from Nic and the Captain only, I enjoy their interpretations. Also, she lost me when she started indirectly criticizing the Innocence Project. I did a quick search on the internet and there are several reasons why Swearingen may be innocent of the other murder. Anyways, interesting case and I hope it is solved but side eyed this episode a bit.

    I would honestly prefer just hearing the entire breakdown of the case by Nic and the Captain. The lady they had on the show appeared to have detailed info but she has her own motivations here, which include her documentary. I hope it helps the case but I would still prefer info from Nic and the Captain only, I enjoy their interpretations. Also, she lost me when she started indirectly criticizing the Innocence Project. I did a quick search on the internet and there are several reasons why Swearingen may be innocent of the other murder. Anyways, interesting case and I hope it is solved but side eyed this episode a bit.

  • John

    John WI

    The mother must've been quite a suspect at the beginning of the investigation First, the fight in the morning. Second, she invites (nearly begs) Melissa to the alley which could've been a trap. Third, if she was involved she controlled the critical first hours after the crime. She clearly not a suspect and her daughter was killed so I feel like an ass saying that but, ya now, I'm a true crime fan.

    The mother must've been quite a suspect at the beginning of the investigation First, the fight in the morning. Second, she invites (nearly begs) Melissa to the alley which could've been a trap. Third, if she was involved she controlled the critical first hours after the crime.

    She clearly not a suspect and her daughter was killed so I feel like an ass saying that but, ya now, I'm a true crime fan.

  • Anne

    Anne Europe

    Sounds like grandson was scared to death with his finding & had nothing to do with murder. C'mon: he told his grandma about body and let her do that call. Anyone knows cold blooded killer sharing details of the crime he committed with his grandma and allow her to report that? I bet that was some kid or teenager who hunts near that location. Grandson'd not have to recognise that he found Missy - with case being all over the papers - his Grandma could suspect that body was in fact the body of kidnapped girl. Moreover, at the time was very common to beat the confession out of someone, just to close the case; If he had any problems with law enforcement before, was hunting or did touch or move the body... I don't know why murderer had to know the girl. I don't think he had. Moreover, I don't think anyone knew Missy will join her mother. She found the note, decided to go, jumped to her car and left - times with no smartphones, that was not her ever-week habit. For me it's muuuuch more possible that was crime of opportunity. Plus I cant see any signs of commitment killer+victim in way she was killed and her body was treated, and usually it is noticeable;

    Sounds like grandson was scared to death with his finding & had nothing to do with murder. C'mon: he told his grandma about body and let her do that call. Anyone knows cold blooded killer sharing details of the crime he committed with his grandma and allow her to report that? I bet that was some kid or teenager who hunts near that location. Grandson'd not have to recognise that he found Missy - with case being all over the papers - his Grandma could suspect that body was in fact the body of kidnapped girl. Moreover, at the time was very common to beat the confession out of someone, just to close the case; If he had any problems with law enforcement before, was hunting or did touch or move the body...

    I don't know why murderer had to know the girl. I don't think he had. Moreover, I don't think anyone knew Missy will join her mother. She found the note, decided to go, jumped to her car and left - times with no smartphones, that was not her ever-week habit. For me it's muuuuch more possible that was crime of opportunity. Plus I cant see any signs of commitment killer+victim in way she was killed and her body was treated, and usually it is noticeable;

  • Hayley

    Hayley Minnesota

    I have to agree with Kelly that this woman seemed biased. I loved the guest that was able to provide details on the D'Wan Sims case because he explained what happened in an unbiased manner then later expressed his disbelief at some of the statements from the mother. Where as, this woman seems to be like Nancy Grace in a way. She gets information from people investigating the crimes, and makes her own connections to make the suspect fit. As always though, thanks for doing such a wonderful job on this podcast. New episodes are the highlight(s) of my week!

    I have to agree with Kelly that this woman seemed biased. I loved the guest that was able to provide details on the D'Wan Sims case because he explained what happened in an unbiased manner then later expressed his disbelief at some of the statements from the mother. Where as, this woman seems to be like Nancy Grace in a way. She gets information from people investigating the crimes, and makes her own connections to make the suspect fit.

    As always though, thanks for doing such a wonderful job on this podcast. New episodes are the highlight(s) of my week!

  • Jods

    Jods MN

    I thought maybe the body was moved by the killer or an associate in order for the killer to continue "visiting" the body. Perhaps the killer needed it moved, because of a change in ability. Or perhaps I have watched or listened to too many true crime podcasts and shows.

    I thought maybe the body was moved by the killer or an associate in order for the killer to continue "visiting" the body. Perhaps the killer needed it moved, because of a change in ability. Or perhaps I have watched or listened to too many true crime podcasts and shows.

  • True Crime Garage

    True Crime Garage

    I need to jump in here. I appreciate the feedback as always. Regarding LaDonna giving her opinion on the case... We should have been a little more clear in the show, because we knew we would be giving our opinion we were asking hers as well. So in fairness we should be taking the blame for LaDonna's opinion sharing. I would also like for everyone to keep in mind that she has been actively looking into this case for about 3 years. She has directly spoke with investigators that have worked this case, witnesses that either knew Missy Witt or a suspect and she has read the case file. So I wanted to make sure we included her opinion as it being that of someone who has been privy to information that the rest of us have not. Cheers, Nic

    I need to jump in here. I appreciate the feedback as always. Regarding LaDonna giving her opinion on the case... We should have been a little more clear in the show, because we knew we would be giving our opinion we were asking hers as well. So in fairness we should be taking the blame for LaDonna's opinion sharing. I would also like for everyone to keep in mind that she has been actively looking into this case for about 3 years. She has directly spoke with investigators that have worked this case, witnesses that either knew Missy Witt or a suspect and she has read the case file. So I wanted to make sure we included her opinion as it being that of someone who has been privy to information that the rest of us have not.
    Cheers,
    Nic

  • Sal Paradise

    Sal Paradise Parts Unknown

    As always, Gentlemen, a brilliantly produced podcast and heartbreaking case. I really believe this was a crime of opportunity due to the abduction taking place in a busy parking lot. If the person had followed Melissa with the intent to commit an abduction, how could they guarantee a parking space near to Melissa's car? The further away they parked, the higher the risk of witnesses. Plus, as it was League Night there was no way to anticipate people exiting the bowling alley, or arriving in the parking lot. Now I am going to contradict myself; how can we be sure that the killer had not messed with Melissa's car battery in the hope of being able to offer her assistance or a ride (thinking of the Zodiac loosening wheel nuts)? If this was the case and they were foiled by her Colleague and Good Samaritan, they could have then indeed followed her. But then why not commit the crime when she got home to change? Obviously, both scenarios are reliant on a rational mind. I hope whoever commited this heinous crime is found and punished to the full extent of the law.

    As always, Gentlemen, a brilliantly produced podcast and heartbreaking case.

    I really believe this was a crime of opportunity due to the abduction taking place in a busy parking lot. If the person had followed Melissa with the intent to commit an abduction, how could they guarantee a parking space near to Melissa's car? The further away they parked, the higher the risk of witnesses. Plus, as it was League Night there was no way to anticipate people exiting the bowling alley, or arriving in the parking lot.

    Now I am going to contradict myself; how can we be sure that the killer had not messed with Melissa's car battery in the hope of being able to offer her assistance or a ride (thinking of the Zodiac loosening wheel nuts)? If this was the case and they were foiled by her Colleague and Good Samaritan, they could have then indeed followed her. But then why not commit the crime when she got home to change? Obviously, both scenarios are reliant on a rational mind.

    I hope whoever commited this heinous crime is found and punished to the full extent of the law.

  • sb

    sb atlanta

    a couple things... maybe i missed it, or just misunderstood, but HOW do they know she was moved? and HOW do they know the original resting place was behind the rock? knowing the body was moved is one thing, but knowing WHERE it originally was leaves me scratching my head. i may have missed something in the conversation? also, like someone else said...i’d MUCH prefer Nic and The Capt just do the story on they’re own. the woman they talked to did not sit well with me. as a psychologist who has worked with both law enforcement AND violent criminals here in Georgia, a lot of what she said does not really add up to me. i certainly commend her for her time, efforts and i imagine money that she has dedicated to missing/murdered teens. but if you listen closely, she speaks from a very egocentric position. a lot of “i”..”me” and “MY team”. i’m not saying she’s wrong, but some of the details she offered seem stretched. like she’s turned it into HER case and is jumping to conclusions.

    a couple things... maybe i missed it, or just misunderstood, but HOW do they know she was moved? and HOW do they know the original resting place was behind the rock? knowing the body was moved is one thing, but knowing WHERE it originally was leaves me scratching my head. i may have missed something in the conversation? also, like someone else said...i’d MUCH prefer Nic and The Capt just do the story on they’re own. the woman they talked to did not sit well with me. as a psychologist who has worked with both law enforcement AND violent criminals here in Georgia, a lot of what she said does not really add up to me. i certainly commend her for her time, efforts and i imagine money that she has dedicated to missing/murdered teens. but if you listen closely, she speaks from a very egocentric position. a lot of “i”..”me” and “MY team”. i’m not saying she’s wrong, but some of the details she offered seem stretched. like she’s turned it into HER case and is jumping to conclusions.

  • Sunny

    Sunny

    Another great episode guys! I had to come on here and ask if anyone else noticed at one point LaDonna responded to Nic with "You're absolutely correct.." and the Capt interjects with "you mean 'you're absolutely right'." I played it back several times and I think I'm hearing it correctly. Now, I'm sure this was inserted after and not actually said while on the phone with LaDonna, but was this just for the LOL's? Are things like this common and I've just been missing them? Is the Capt messing with us/me?? Happy Weekend All!

    Another great episode guys!
    I had to come on here and ask if anyone else noticed at one point LaDonna responded to Nic with "You're absolutely correct.." and the Capt interjects with "you mean 'you're absolutely right'." I played it back several times and I think I'm hearing it correctly. Now, I'm sure this was inserted after and not actually said while on the phone with LaDonna, but was this just for the LOL's? Are things like this common and I've just been missing them? Is the Capt messing with us/me??
    Happy Weekend All!

  • True Crime Garage

    True Crime Garage

    Alright Sunny you caught us. Yes the Captain added the "you're absolutely right" afterward and yes he is messing with you. Cheers, Nic

    Alright Sunny you caught us.
    Yes the Captain added the "you're absolutely right" afterward and yes he is messing with you.
    Cheers,
    Nic

  • Mellow

    Mellow Seattle

    Kelly totally agree.. Just have to say, the guest on the Melissa Witt episodes, thumbs down. Maybe Larry did kill Trotter like she said, especially if there was the ligature and fiber evidence but u can't put blinders on and be biased. "Of course she had another man's DNA under finger nails she had gone to school. Honestly I would be surprised if she didn't have someone else's honestly". Really? That's bullshit. She's basically saying every conviction on finger nail DNA is garbage.

    Kelly totally agree..

    Just have to say, the guest on the Melissa Witt episodes, thumbs down. Maybe Larry did kill Trotter like she said, especially if there was the ligature and fiber evidence but u can't put blinders on and be biased. "Of course she had another man's DNA under finger nails she had gone to school. Honestly I would be surprised if she didn't have someone else's honestly". Really? That's bullshit. She's basically saying every conviction on finger nail DNA is garbage.

  • Calista

    Calista San Diego

    Actually I'm just now listening to the Melissa Wit Case (playing catch up) and Nic always says "that's exactly right and that is what the Captain interjected with after Lodonna has said he was "absolutely correct."

    Actually I'm just now listening to the Melissa Wit Case (playing catch up) and Nic always says "that's exactly right and that is what the Captain interjected with after Lodonna has said he was "absolutely correct."

  • Beth

    Beth Pittsburgh

    "If I was approached by a strange man in a parking lot I might scream and run away." My god. I'd be screaming and running through parking lots every other day.

    "If I was approached by a strange man in a parking lot I might scream and run away."

    My god. I'd be screaming and running through parking lots every other day.

  • LaDonna

    LaDonna

    Hey everyone ! I am just now reading these comments and I wanted to take a moment to thank everyone for listening in and for caring about the Melissa Witt case. As Nic mentioned above, I was asked to give my opinion from the perspective of the documentary team that has been working on this case with me for the past three years. Any mention of "I" or "My" or "We" was really just an effort to make sure the audience understood that I was sharing my opinion/the opinion of the documentary team. I didn't want anyone listening to think I was sharing the opinion of an other party to the case -- including law enforcement. Unfortunately, due to confidentiality, I would not be allowed to share things I have learned from the case file and/or opinions of the retired or current detectives without their express consent. At times, I do share those opinions and we often to media interviews together. While I am passionate about this case, I can say that I do not have all of the answers... I do have some very strong opinions about the case based on my research and extensive work on this case but at the end of the day, it's just my opinion. I could be wrong... and I am ok with that... I just want to see Melissa Witt's killer caught. Someone asked how Law Enforcement knew the body was moved. Long story short: There was evidence behind the rock that made it clear Melissa's body had been placed there originally. (There was even an indention in the ground where her body had been... so she had definitely been there first and then moved... by someone. That aspect of the case is so incredibly strange!). One thing I can say is that law enforcement and other experts who have reviewed this case feel that the location where Melissa's body was found is crucial to the case. Law enforcement, not the team I am working with, have always made that area huge focus in the investigation. After reviewing the case for so long, I tend to agree with them. The rock Melissa's body was found behind was not something that would particularly stick out to someone who was randomly trying to stash a body -- there were many other places and rocks that would have been a better hiding location in my opinion. Someone also mentioned that I may have other motivations here ... like my documentary. While it is true that the documentary is very important to me because it is a tool that could help bring more exposure to Melissa's case, it is not the end all of end all for me at all. I truly want to see justice for Melissa Witt. However, I am bound to confidentiality in this open murder investigation. There are things that I am legally unable to talk about -- even in the documentary.... and I take that very seriously. I don't want to compromise the case in any way and the detectives I have been working with on Melissa's case have given me the green light on what I can discuss. Lastly, (and two points here:) First, I want to apologize that my comments about the Innocence Project offended anyone. That really wasn't my intent. The Innocence Project has done some phenomenal work. I will not dispute that. Do I agree with their support of Larry Swearingen? No. I do not. However, I apologize for how I approached the situation in my interview. Second, I do believe that Larry Swearingen killed Melissa Trotter. I've studied that case for as long as I have the Witt case and I didn't have as much time to share all of the details of the case as it really takes to understand the complexities of the DNA issues. I am in no way discounting DNA evidence in terms of evidence found under Melissa Trotter's fingernails. However, in Melissa Trotter's situation, there are more reasons that evidence under her fingernails did not sway the jury to reasonable doubt. There are many more reasons than the one I gave in the interview and I realize now that I should have gone in more detail. At the end of the day, I am someone who is working very hard to at least bring exposure to the case of Melissa Witt -- a case that is over two decades old. I certainly do not have all of the answers and I am very open to discussion and debate as I want every single avenue looked at that could lead to answers in her murder investigation. I am truly appreciative for the opportunity that was given to me to be a part of the True Crime Garage podcast. This opportunity has brought SO much exposure to Melissa Witt's case and I am forever grateful. I am also grateful for the honest feedback and discussion about the interview. I appreciate each and every one of you and I do hope you will continue the discussion! You are also free to email me directly with questions or comments at whokilledmissywitt (at) gmail (dot) com.

    Hey everyone ! I am just now reading these comments and I wanted to take a moment to thank everyone for listening in and for caring about the Melissa Witt case. As Nic mentioned above, I was asked to give my opinion from the perspective of the documentary team that has been working on this case with me for the past three years. Any mention of "I" or "My" or "We" was really just an effort to make sure the audience understood that I was sharing my opinion/the opinion of the documentary team. I didn't want anyone listening to think I was sharing the opinion of an other party to the case -- including law enforcement. Unfortunately, due to confidentiality, I would not be allowed to share things I have learned from the case file and/or opinions of the retired or current detectives without their express consent. At times, I do share those opinions and we often to media interviews together. While I am passionate about this case, I can say that I do not have all of the answers... I do have some very strong opinions about the case based on my research and extensive work on this case but at the end of the day, it's just my opinion. I could be wrong... and I am ok with that... I just want to see Melissa Witt's killer caught. Someone asked how Law Enforcement knew the body was moved. Long story short: There was evidence behind the rock that made it clear Melissa's body had been placed there originally. (There was even an indention in the ground where her body had been... so she had definitely been there first and then moved... by someone. That aspect of the case is so incredibly strange!). One thing I can say is that law enforcement and other experts who have reviewed this case feel that the location where Melissa's body was found is crucial to the case. Law enforcement, not the team I am working with, have always made that area huge focus in the investigation. After reviewing the case for so long, I tend to agree with them. The rock Melissa's body was found behind was not something that would particularly stick out to someone who was randomly trying to stash a body -- there were many other places and rocks that would have been a better hiding location in my opinion. Someone also mentioned that I may have other motivations here ... like my documentary. While it is true that the documentary is very important to me because it is a tool that could help bring more exposure to Melissa's case, it is not the end all of end all for me at all. I truly want to see justice for Melissa Witt. However, I am bound to confidentiality in this open murder investigation. There are things that I am legally unable to talk about -- even in the documentary.... and I take that very seriously. I don't want to compromise the case in any way and the detectives I have been working with on Melissa's case have given me the green light on what I can discuss.

    Lastly, (and two points heresmile First, I want to apologize that my comments about the Innocence Project offended anyone. That really wasn't my intent. The Innocence Project has done some phenomenal work. I will not dispute that. Do I agree with their support of Larry Swearingen? No. I do not. However, I apologize for how I approached the situation in my interview. Second, I do believe that Larry Swearingen killed Melissa Trotter. I've studied that case for as long as I have the Witt case and I didn't have as much time to share all of the details of the case as it really takes to understand the complexities of the DNA issues. I am in no way discounting DNA evidence in terms of evidence found under Melissa Trotter's fingernails. However, in Melissa Trotter's situation, there are more reasons that evidence under her fingernails did not sway the jury to reasonable doubt. There are many more reasons than the one I gave in the interview and I realize now that I should have gone in more detail.

    At the end of the day, I am someone who is working very hard to at least bring exposure to the case of Melissa Witt -- a case that is over two decades old. I certainly do not have all of the answers and I am very open to discussion and debate as I want every single avenue looked at that could lead to answers in her murder investigation.

    I am truly appreciative for the opportunity that was given to me to be a part of the True Crime Garage podcast. This opportunity has brought SO much exposure to Melissa Witt's case and I am forever grateful. I am also grateful for the honest feedback and discussion about the interview. I appreciate each and every one of you and I do hope you will continue the discussion! You are also free to email me directly with questions or comments at whokilledmissywitt (at) gmail (dot) com.

  • True Crime Garage

    True Crime Garage

    Thank you LaDonna and of course thank you again for the interview. I too have reviewed the Melissa Trotter murder and there is no doubt in my mind that Larry Swearingen is guilty in that case. I'm still hoping for maybe some type of deathbed confession from him, as I believe he has killed others. I'm looking forward to the Melissa Witt documentary and I hope it will breath much needed new life into this case. Cheers Nic

    Thank you LaDonna and of course thank you again for the interview. I too have reviewed the Melissa Trotter murder and there is no doubt in my mind that Larry Swearingen is guilty in that case. I'm still hoping for maybe some type of deathbed confession from him, as I believe he has killed others. I'm looking forward to the Melissa Witt documentary and I hope it will breath much needed new life into this case.
    Cheers Nic

  • Barbara B.

    Barbara B.

    Hey guys. I discovered your podcast yesterday and I am hooked! I think you both do a tremendous job on presenting the facts and bringing up points for discussion. It works that you sometimes differ in opinion because that leads to a more thoughtful discussion. Keep up the good work and I know that my plans for this upcoming weekend will involve listening to all of these podcasts! Regarding this case I have a few comments. Do we know how old the grandson was that is called 911? I think knowing the age would be telling. If he was a young boy I am not sure he would have committed the crime of moves the body. He may have just discovered it and been scared. Also, why is Ladonna so quick to assume that the anonymous call was linked to Melissa? Once again if it was a young person that called it could have been for something else. My initial thoughts about the movement of the body is that there was a second person involved or knew about the crime but was not the murderer and felt guilty about it. Being that this crime was committed in December, what was the temperature and weather conditions. Despite the body being out for about 6 weeks was it preserved? I am very much looking forward to the documentary.

    Hey guys. I discovered your podcast yesterday and I am hooked! I think you both do a tremendous job on presenting the facts and bringing up points for discussion. It works that you sometimes differ in opinion because that leads to a more thoughtful discussion. Keep up the good work and I know that my plans for this upcoming weekend will involve listening to all of these podcasts!

    Regarding this case I have a few comments. Do we know how old the grandson was that is called 911? I think knowing the age would be telling. If he was a young boy I am not sure he would have committed the crime of moves the body. He may have just discovered it and been scared. Also, why is Ladonna so quick to assume that the anonymous call was linked to Melissa? Once again if it was a young person that called it could have been for something else.
    My initial thoughts about the movement of the body is that there was a second person involved or knew about the crime but was not the murderer and felt guilty about it.
    Being that this crime was committed in December, what was the temperature and weather conditions. Despite the body being out for about 6 weeks was it preserved?
    I am very much looking forward to the documentary.

  • True Crime Garage

    True Crime Garage

    Hi Barbara, So LaDonna has information that she could not include that the caller said during the call that would indicate the call was connected. She is trying to obtain permission to use that in the doc. I think that call and releasing that info may break this case open. Someone may be able to identify one of the callers by voice or by statements said during the call. This was a grandmother and grandson calling. The grandson would not have been young he would have been Melissa's age or maybe a little older. Cheers Nic

    Hi Barbara,
    So LaDonna has information that she could not include that the caller said during the call that would indicate the call was connected. She is trying to obtain permission to use that in the doc. I think that call and releasing that info may break this case open. Someone may be able to identify one of the callers by voice or by statements said during the call. This was a grandmother and grandson calling. The grandson would not have been young he would have been Melissa's age or maybe a little older. Cheers Nic

  • LaDonna

    LaDonna Arkansas

    Hi, Barbara! Thank you for your comments. Nic is correct... but I also wanted to say that Law Enforcement made the determination that the call was about Melissa. I do also believe that to be the case, though. As to the other question about the body, it was badly decomposed.

    Hi, Barbara! Thank you for your comments. Nic is correct... but I also wanted to say that Law Enforcement made the determination that the call was about Melissa. I do also believe that to be the case, though. As to the other question about the body, it was badly decomposed.

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