The Cheshire Murders /// 154 /// 155

44 comments

  • Jo

    Jo Parts Unknown, USA

    Why was the fire department never called when neighbors noticed smoke?

    Why was the fire department never called when neighbors noticed smoke?

  • Mary Egan

    Mary Egan East Hampton

    I grew up and lived in Cheshire for 23 years. I’ve been past the Petit house before it was torn down. It was haunting, even 10 years later I lose my breath every time I think of the Petit girls.

    I grew up and lived in Cheshire for 23 years. I’ve been past the Petit house before it was torn down. It was haunting, even 10 years later I lose my breath every time I think of the Petit girls.

  • Veselin Stankov

    Veselin Stankov

    Man, these are lower than the scum of the earth! Words cannot express what a waste of life those two are...

    Man, these are lower than the scum of the earth! Words cannot express what a waste of life those two are...

  • Janis

    Janis MI

    First...You both did a wonderful job telling this HORRIFIC story. I mean this one literally gives me nightmares. I started the HBO doc and couldn't finish it, it was just SO DISTURBING:/ just one thing that keeps nagging at me...when Jennifer was at the bank...why did they not try to keep her there? Like sit her down and make it look like they need more info for such a large withdrawal and than send the cops out to the house?! They should not have let her leave the bank :/. Uugghh

    First...You both did a wonderful job telling this HORRIFIC story. I mean this one literally gives me nightmares. I started the HBO doc and couldn't finish it, it was just SO DISTURBING:/ just one thing that keeps nagging at me...when Jennifer was at the bank...why did they not try to keep her there? Like sit her down and make it look like they need more info for such a large withdrawal and than send the cops out to the house?! They should not have let her leave the bank :/. Uugghh

  • True Crime Garage

    True Crime Garage

    Jo and Janis, It's easy to question all the what ifs. If this would have happened or if I would have just done this maybe one or all three of the Petit girls would still be alive. Bill talked about this at length saying he questioned everything about himself, his house and that night for a very long time. Mainly asking himself why he never bothered to fix the lock to the cellar door, that's how they got in. The police were on the scene when smoke and fire were first spotted. Steven and Joshua started the fire in the interior and center locations of the house and then s all happened very quickly. As for the bank I'm sure each has some protocol but what that is I don't know, Jennifer wanted to leave. Steven was waiting for her outside. We should ask ourselves these question but also remind ourselves that at the end of the day when we still have questions or the answers don't make us feel any better Steven Hayes and Joshua Komisarjevsky are responsible for these murders. They are the only ones to blame. Each of them had hundreds of opportunities to do a hundred things differently that night but they didn't and they were determined to not be stopped. Nic

    Jo and Janis,
    It's easy to question all the what ifs. If this would have happened or if I would have just done this maybe one or all three of the Petit girls would still be alive. Bill talked about this at length saying he questioned everything about himself, his house and that night for a very long time. Mainly asking himself why he never bothered to fix the lock to the cellar door, that's how they got in. The police were on the scene when smoke and fire were first spotted. Steven and Joshua started the fire in the interior and center locations of the house and then s all happened very quickly. As for the bank I'm sure each has some protocol but what that is I don't know, Jennifer wanted to leave. Steven was waiting for her outside. We should ask ourselves these question but also remind ourselves that at the end of the day when we still have questions or the answers don't make us feel any better Steven Hayes and Joshua Komisarjevsky are responsible for these murders. They are the only ones to blame. Each of them had hundreds of opportunities to do a hundred things differently that night but they didn't and they were determined to not be stopped.
    Nic

  • Jen

    Jen CT

    I was one of the people called to jury duty for Steven Hayes trial. He was in that room with us while we were questioned. I can't even describe the feeling of seeing that piece of shit across the room. This story is horrifying and chills me to the core listening to it over again. So incredibly sad.

    I was one of the people called to jury duty for Steven Hayes trial. He was in that room with us while we were questioned. I can't even describe the feeling of seeing that piece of shit across the room. This story is horrifying and chills me to the core listening to it over again. So incredibly sad.

  • LouLouLeRoux

    LouLouLeRoux

    This is such a heartbreaking story. I can't imagine the survivor's guilt that Bill must live with. I appreciated the brief discussion about capital punishment, even though it seems it wasn't the intention touch on that topic. It's a topic that gets people easily heated because it's evocative and emotive. I would really love an entire episode on this topic, hearing not only Nic & The Captain's opinions but maybe some guest speakers representing each side. Personally, I don't believe in capital punishment but I am always interested in hearing others' opinions. There's nothing quite like a good debate. And when it comes to true crime, punishment is part of the story. Anyhow, a random thought & suggestion. But, as always, great job guys!

    This is such a heartbreaking story. I can't imagine the survivor's guilt that Bill must live with. I appreciated the brief discussion about capital punishment, even though it seems it wasn't the intention touch on that topic. It's a topic that gets people easily heated because it's evocative and emotive. I would really love an entire episode on this topic, hearing not only Nic & The Captain's opinions but maybe some guest speakers representing each side. Personally, I don't believe in capital punishment but I am always interested in hearing others' opinions. There's nothing quite like a good debate. And when it comes to true crime, punishment is part of the story.
    Anyhow, a random thought & suggestion. But, as always, great job guys!

  • LouLouLeRoux

    LouLouLeRoux

    Follow-up to my other comment: my suggesting an episode to discuss capital punishment isn't to be inflammatory or to get a debate happening in the comments section. I truly believe that punishment is a big part of these true crime stories and discussing both sides could be beneficial.

    Follow-up to my other comment: my suggesting an episode to discuss capital punishment isn't to be inflammatory or to get a debate happening in the comments section. I truly believe that punishment is a big part of these true crime stories and discussing both sides could be beneficial.

  • Michelle

    Michelle Tennessee

    Hope you guys got through this one without being angry at each other. I detected some "testyness" between you two. LOVE this show!! Your guys are a wonderful duo. Keep up the good work. Be kind to each other, and don't litter.

    Hope you guys got through this one without being angry at each other. I detected some "testyness" between you two. LOVE this show!! Your guys are a wonderful duo. Keep up the good work. Be kind to each other, and don't litter.

  • JTallroth

    JTallroth

    I applaud your coverage of this case! One of the best couple of episodes yet and, most importantly, a in depth coverage that didn’t just tell the story but a coverage that really made me (and I’m sure many others) think, evaluate and ponder lots of things. Interesting, respectful, detailed and thought provoking. Just a a great job! Thanks! //Johannes @jtallroth

    I applaud your coverage of this case! One of the best couple of episodes yet and, most importantly, a in depth coverage that didn’t just tell the story but a coverage that really made me (and I’m sure many others) think, evaluate and ponder lots of things. Interesting, respectful, detailed and thought provoking. Just a a great job! Thanks!
    //Johannes
    @jtallroth

  • Janis

    Janis Mi

    Yes, I agree the two that committed the crime are ultimately the only two responsible...this one just gets me right in the gut and I just keep thinking what if...I wasn't trying to be judgy...thanks again for covering this case I'm sure it wasn't easy 🖤

    Yes, I agree the two that committed the crime are ultimately the only two responsible...this one just gets me right in the gut and I just keep thinking what if...I wasn't trying to be judgy...thanks again for covering this case I'm sure it wasn't easy 🖤

  • Kelly

    Kelly Los Angeles, CA

    Wow, what a horrible chain of events. So sad. Especially sad and infuriating because it could have been stopped at so many points. You guys did a great job of breaking it down. I will say I got uncomfortable when you got into your dispute in the second part, I felt like my two buddies were arguing and I just wanted it to stop. Other than that, very good job. I have to say though and will probably get yelled at but there is something about the dad that just isn't right to me, I cannot put my finger on it though. Anyways, what a terrible case however getting the story out there might help someone else, you never know.

    Wow, what a horrible chain of events. So sad. Especially sad and infuriating because it could have been stopped at so many points. You guys did a great job of breaking it down. I will say I got uncomfortable when you got into your dispute in the second part, I felt like my two buddies were arguing and I just wanted it to stop. Other than that, very good job. I have to say though and will probably get yelled at but there is something about the dad that just isn't right to me, I cannot put my finger on it though. Anyways, what a terrible case however getting the story out there might help someone else, you never know.

  • Caroline

    Caroline Clarksburg

    Thank you for your coverage of this case, another terrific job, the difference in your points of view is great and I love the realistic convos you both engage in on each case and this was no exception. I have commented before but I want to ask again if you can take a look and do a show on Dr. Jeffrey MacDonald , Fort Bragg, NC, who was convicted and sentenced for murder of his wife and two daughters in February 1970. Even though I am from Washington DC, this case was my introduction into my fascination with true crime. Pretty pretty please. Keep up the awesome show:)

    Thank you for your coverage of this case, another terrific job, the difference in your points of view is great and I love the realistic convos you both engage in on each case and this was no exception. I have commented before but I want to ask again if you can take a look and do a show on Dr. Jeffrey MacDonald , Fort Bragg, NC, who was convicted and sentenced for murder of his wife and two daughters in February 1970. Even though I am from Washington DC, this case was my introduction into my fascination with true crime. Pretty pretty please. Keep up the awesome showsmile

  • Yuval

    Yuval Middle East

    I don't know why but this case frustrates me. And it's not the police. It's the fact that these people just..... They killed 3 people to hide their crime and got caught 5 minutes later.... Ugh they are such miserable stupid fucktards.

    I don't know why but this case frustrates me. And it's not the police. It's the fact that these people just..... They killed 3 people to hide their crime and got caught 5 minutes later.... Ugh they are such miserable stupid fucktards.

  • Ericka

    Ericka California

    Wow such a heart breaking story, greatly told.

    Wow such a heart breaking story, greatly told.

  • Gretchen

    Gretchen

    Great coverage of a difficult case. I enjoyed the head butting you guys did over the death penalty vs life with no parole. I work in the prison system in Ohio so I can only speak about that. Life without parole in Ohio is not as bad as one might think. I work in a prison that houses inmates who are security levels 1 and 2, which is the lowest. For sure it is prison, but I have 3 inmates working for me who are sentenced to life w/o parole and they have the same “freedom” (such as it is) as a guy sentenced to a year for not paying child support. They have worked their way down to a lower security level via good behavior. I don’t begrudge them this at all. When you work there you have to look beyond the crime. None of them are as henious as the two in the Cheshire case though. Ohio still has the death penalty and inmates on death row are locked up basically 22 or 23 hours a day. That is the punishment those two deserve. I don’t know what privileges (or lack of) they have but I hope they are locked down more often than not. Intellectually I oppose the death penalty, but each time Ohio has executed someone and I hear what his crime was, I find it hard to get very upset about it. I guess I agree with Nic that if Bill wanted them to get the death penalty then that is what should have happened. One thing I know for sure - no matter how “easy” an inmate has it in prison, there is no way that the inmates I deal with would not give anything to go back in time and make their crime not have happened. Keep up the great work guys! I love listening to you on my long commute to my prison job.

    Great coverage of a difficult case. I enjoyed the head butting you guys did over the death penalty vs life with no parole. I work in the prison system in Ohio so I can only speak about that. Life without parole in Ohio is not as bad as one might think. I work in a prison that houses inmates who are security levels 1 and 2, which is the lowest. For sure it is prison, but I have 3 inmates working for me who are sentenced to life w/o parole and they have the same “freedom” (such as it is) as a guy sentenced to a year for not paying child support. They have worked their way down to a lower security level via good behavior.

    I don’t begrudge them this at all. When you work there you have to look beyond the crime. None of them are as henious as the two in the Cheshire case though. Ohio still has the death penalty and inmates on death row are locked up basically 22 or 23 hours a day. That is the punishment those two deserve. I don’t know what privileges (or lack of) they have but I hope they are locked down more often than not.

    Intellectually I oppose the death penalty, but each time Ohio has executed someone and I hear what his crime was, I find it hard to get very upset about it. I guess I agree with Nic that if Bill wanted them to get the death penalty then that is what should have happened.

    One thing I know for sure - no matter how “easy” an inmate has it in prison, there is no way that the inmates I deal with would not give anything to go back in time and make their crime not have happened.

    Keep up the great work guys! I love listening to you on my long commute to my prison job.

  • Cara

    Cara Parts unknown

    Janis - I think Jennifer probably didn't want to delay too long at the bank because JK was back at the house with her daughters and husband as hostages for her good behavior.

    Janis -
    I think Jennifer probably didn't want to delay too long at the bank because JK was back at the house with her daughters and husband as hostages for her good behavior.

  • Katie

    Katie NC

    This episode was so terrifying, you guys did a great job recounting it. You going to cover Sherri Papinni in the garage?! I’m sure it’s been suggesting a gazillion times. Keep up the good work!

    This episode was so terrifying, you guys did a great job recounting it.
    You going to cover Sherri Papinni in the garage?! I’m sure it’s been suggesting a gazillion times. Keep up the good work!

  • True Crime Garage

    True Crime Garage

    Caroline and Katie, Yes we will cover McDonald at some point. He's on the list and often suggested. Sherri Papinni will go on the list as well. Cheers, Nic

    Caroline and Katie,
    Yes we will cover McDonald at some point. He's on the list and often suggested. Sherri Papinni will go on the list as well.
    Cheers,
    Nic

  • True Crime Garage

    True Crime Garage

    If you are all caught up on TCG episodes and you want some more casual crime chat. Check out the GTFO podcast, episode 42-Nic. Featuring yours truly, talking with Rico and Chad last Sunday. I sat down and had a beer Sunday evening and we talked about DB Cooper, Ohio Cold Cases and the origins of the garage and "the horde" Cheers, Nic

    If you are all caught up on TCG episodes and you want some more casual crime chat. Check out the GTFO podcast, episode 42-Nic. Featuring yours truly, talking with Rico and Chad last Sunday. I sat down and had a beer Sunday evening and we talked about DB Cooper, Ohio Cold Cases and the origins of the garage and "the horde"
    Cheers,
    Nic

  • Manuela

    Manuela Sacramento

    Hey guys! This show blows my mind every episode, but this story left me feeling haunted. It’s awful. Just awful. I hate to have to know and believe there are actual people like that. I’ll tell you what though, I just checked the condition of every single lock on any possible point of entry into my house. Twice. Thanks again. That story provokes thoughts that may save a life somewhere. There was an incident in my hometown that has bothered me for years and years. The most bothersome aspect was the total lack of coverage. I don’t know if it was because of the socioeconomical status of the victim or the police hiding the shitty job they did, all I know is that the story disappeared super quick. I can’t find anything on it myself. I can’t even remember the girls name. But the story,as I remember it, went like this, 3 (maybe 4) children. Young, under 12 I’m sure, were playing in and around some rice silos in West Sacramento in the early 1990s. They were seen by drivers on the freeway who called in to the police, but there was no action taken because the dispatcher couldn’t understand the discription of the location as given by the caller. Apparently the caller was not from the town. Any resident of west sac would have know immediately what the caller meant when she said the silos by the freeway. The 911 dispatcher had no idea. A couple days later the news had reported a missing little girl. The caller called again urging the police to check the silos. Eventually they did. And they found the little girl dead. There was speculation that the boys may have had something to do with it. There were also many rumors that the little girl had suffered physical and sexual abuse at home. The 911 caller was furious that police didn’t react to her initial report, feeling like they could have saved that child’s life. It seemed to me like a case that the whole community should have known about. To learn from. To get better by. But very shortly after the little girls body was found the story was over. I don’t even remember any type of community gathering like you see today with vigils and such. It was simply over. What happened? Why didn’t the police go looking for her sooner? Did the boys have anything to do with it? What happened to the family? The silos are down now. But why were children able to get into them in the first place? If you can’t cover the story, could you maybe at least give me some tips on how I can find those answers myself? This has bothered me for years. Either way, thanks guys. For that and all you do! ~manuela

    Hey guys!
    This show blows my mind every episode, but this story left me feeling haunted. It’s awful. Just awful. I hate to have to know and believe there are actual people like that. I’ll tell you what though, I just checked the condition of every single lock on any possible point of entry into my house. Twice.
    Thanks again. That story provokes thoughts that may save a life somewhere.

    There was an incident in my hometown that has bothered me for years and years. The most bothersome aspect was the total lack of coverage. I don’t know if it was because of the socioeconomical status of the victim or the police hiding the shitty job they did, all I know is that the story disappeared super quick. I can’t find anything on it myself. I can’t even remember the girls name. But the story,as I remember it, went like this, 3 (maybe 4) children. Young, under 12 I’m sure, were playing in and around some rice silos in West Sacramento in the early 1990s. They were seen by drivers on the freeway who called in to the police, but there was no action taken because the dispatcher couldn’t understand the discription of the location as given by the caller. Apparently the caller was not from the town. Any resident of west sac would have know immediately what the caller meant when she said the silos by the freeway. The 911 dispatcher had no idea.
    A couple days later the news had reported a missing little girl. The caller called again urging the police to check the silos.
    Eventually they did. And they found the little girl dead. There was speculation that the boys may have had something to do with it. There were also many rumors that the little girl had suffered physical and sexual abuse at home. The 911 caller was furious that police didn’t react to her initial report, feeling like they could have saved that child’s life. It seemed to me like a case that the whole community should have known about. To learn from. To get better by. But very shortly after the little girls body was found the story was over. I don’t even remember any type of community gathering like you see today with vigils and such. It was simply over. What happened? Why didn’t the police go looking for her sooner? Did the boys have anything to do with it? What happened to the family?
    The silos are down now. But why were children able to get into them in the first place?
    If you can’t cover the story, could you maybe at least give me some tips on how I can find those answers myself? This has bothered me for years.
    Either way, thanks guys. For that and all you do!
    ~manuela

  • Debbie

    Debbie Maryland

    Nic, it was great to see your interview on GTFO. I hope we’ll get to see more interviews with you in the future or perhaps you and the captain giving a video discussion on a case. Great job with the podcast and especially the latest Cheshire case. I found myself screaming “fucking pieces of shit” at the top of my lungs - driving in my car! - while listening to this case. This case is bad for the blood pressure. Keep up the good work. You guys are great.

    Nic, it was great to see your interview on GTFO. I hope we’ll get to see more interviews with you in the future or perhaps you and the captain giving a video discussion on a case.

    Great job with the podcast and especially the latest Cheshire case. I found myself screaming “fucking pieces of shit” at the top of my lungs - driving in my car! - while listening to this case. This case is bad for the blood pressure.

    Keep up the good work. You guys are great.

  • R.J.D.

    R.J.D.

    How do I view photos that are described during the podcasts ? Thank you

    How do I view photos that are described during the podcasts ? Thank you

  • Janis

    Janis MI

    Just listened to the GTFO interview...very interesting. I'm so glad you did NOT choose to do fantasy football!! 😼 Your podcast is something I look forward to every week, and now that I know from reading these comments that Jeffrey McDonald is ion the list I will be waiting (a little impatiently) 🖤

    Just listened to the GTFO interview...very interesting. I'm so glad you did NOT choose to do fantasy football!! 😼
    Your podcast is something I look forward to every week, and now that I know from reading these comments that Jeffrey McDonald is ion the list I will be waiting (a little impatiently) 🖤

  • Stanley (Amanda)

    Stanley (Amanda) Ohio

    Hi guys! Huge fan of the pod! Captain... be nicer to Nic. :) As far as the Cheshire murders go, has anyone suggested that the murderers had a police scanner? Maybe that’s why they decided to kill the family. They’re sick either way, and that’s a thought I had while contemplating why they would lie to the wife. The only other reason I could guess was when they realized Bill had gotten out, they figured he was long gone and decided to punish him by killing his family. It would be the ultimate punishment because he has to live the rest of his life knowing his family was brutally murdered. Keep up the great work guys! Thanks for the great shows. -Stanley (Amanda)

    Hi guys! Huge fan of the pod! Captain... be nicer to Nic. smile As far as the Cheshire murders go, has anyone suggested that the murderers had a police scanner? Maybe that’s why they decided to kill the family. They’re sick either way, and that’s a thought I had while contemplating why they would lie to the wife. The only other reason I could guess was when they realized Bill had gotten out, they figured he was long gone and decided to punish him by killing his family. It would be the ultimate punishment because he has to live the rest of his life knowing his family was brutally murdered. Keep up the great work guys! Thanks for the great shows.
    -Stanley (Amanda)

  • True Crime Garage

    True Crime Garage

    Manuela Without the victim's name it's going to be tough for us to do anything with this. I'll look around. For you, there should be some record of it some where. I would start by getting creative with the google searches. Next do you know anyone that knows someone that worked as a first responder during that time frame? Fire fighter, EMT, police? Maybe you could tell them the story and dredge up the name from memory. Or go to the biggest and best library in that city. Go to the micro film section and talk to the person in charge. They will give you some tips on speeding up your search but it will take a day or two to find the old newspaper stories. Nic

    Manuela
    Without the victim's name it's going to be tough for us to do anything with this. I'll look around. For you, there should be some record of it some where. I would start by getting creative with the google searches. Next do you know anyone that knows someone that worked as a first responder during that time frame? Fire fighter, EMT, police? Maybe you could tell them the story and dredge up the name from memory. Or go to the biggest and best library in that city. Go to the micro film section and talk to the person in charge. They will give you some tips on speeding up your search but it will take a day or two to find the old newspaper stories.
    Nic

  • True Crime Garage

    True Crime Garage

    RJD, A lot,of the photos, especially some of the ones I described or that only the jury saw where never released to the public for many good reasons. Some of the other photos are available simply by searching images via Bing or Google - - Cheshire, Connecticut home invasion murders- Nic

    RJD,
    A lot,of the photos, especially some of the ones I described or that only the jury saw where never released to the public for many good reasons. Some of the other photos are available simply by searching images via Bing or Google -
    - Cheshire, Connecticut home invasion murders-
    Nic

  • Jennifer F

    Jennifer F Tennessee

    My heat is broken for this family. I can see why the jurors would be offered PTS services. I feel PTS just listening. I was on a jury for a murder 7 yeas ago and I still think about the case and the photos/ bloody cloths we had to look at. I'm not team Captin or Team Nic, I'm team TCG because I love you both but I agree with Nic on this one. These creeps need to be put in the ground.

    My heat is broken for this family. I can see why the jurors would be offered PTS services. I feel PTS just listening. I was on a jury for a murder 7 yeas ago and I still think about the case and the photos/ bloody cloths we had to look at. I'm not team Captin or Team Nic, I'm team TCG because I love you both but I agree with Nic on this one. These creeps need to be put in the ground.

  • InSchoolForComputer

    InSchoolForComputer WI

    Nic, You promoted this blog as a way for fans to stay current on all your case files To that end, is there a way to catalog the cases without having to click 15 next buttons to find it, maybe a link at the top could bring up a listing of the cases for quicker access Great job on Cheshire, I felt the HBO doc was way too sympathetic to the scum

    Nic,
    You promoted this blog as a way for fans to stay current on all your case files
    To that end, is there a way to catalog the cases without having to click 15 next buttons to find it, maybe a link at the top could bring up a listing of the cases for quicker access
    Great job on Cheshire, I felt the HBO doc was way too sympathetic to the scum

  • Sandy

    Sandy

    I couldn’t even listen to this episode. This crime is just so, so horrific.

    I couldn’t even listen to this episode. This crime is just so, so horrific.

  • Manuela

    Manuela Sacramento CA

    Nic, thanks. I got to diggin last night and I found one single newspaper clip from San Fransisco. Nothing local. It sucks. It’s ike she never existed. It was 1997. And her name was Heidi Unbrick. 13 year old sixth grader. But the story is from BEFORE her body was found. There is NOTHING anywhere about the 911 caller. Or the boys. Not that I can see. I guess it’s just one of those things. No one much cared about. When they did find her it was clear right away that even if the police had went directly there and found her within minutes, it was still too late. She died in that fall. I’m fact she was dead before she hit the bottom as I recall it. Her poor little body falling into whatever kind of things are inside a huge silo like that. Stairs I imagine maybe. But I remember that made me a little less pissed. The response from 911 would have at best shortened the search. But it wasn’t going to save her. There is a true crime book called “LIke Father Like Son” where a cop tells the son a version of the story while trying to get him to confess about his and his fathers crimes. It’s an imteresting paragraph. But not exactly 100% factual. I remember being so frustrated and just DRIVEN by the 911 caller who couldn’t get the dispatcher to send units out because the dispatcher was unfamiliar with the area so had no idea. It’s like (was) RIGHT THERE. You can’t miss it. Right as you cross the river on the I80. You cross out of sac, into west sac, and yolo county and it was pretty much the first thing you saw. You couldn’t miss it. But this dispatcher had no idea. I remember when they tore them down. I actually went to watch it. I always hated them big dead things. And after that child died there it turned my stomach every time I seen them. I guess you guys probably understand how sometimes a tragic event can just haunt a person. Even one not closely involved. This has been my haunting. And i guess it’ll stay that way. But thank you for your reply! I was hella stoaked about it. I love you guys and the show. And I totally read that email in your voice! Awesome. Thanks.

    Nic, thanks. I got to diggin last night and I found one single newspaper clip from San Fransisco. Nothing local. It sucks. It’s ike she never existed. It was 1997. And her name was Heidi Unbrick. 13 year old sixth grader. But the story is from BEFORE her body was found. There is NOTHING anywhere about the 911 caller. Or the boys. Not that I can see. I guess it’s just one of those things. No one much cared about.
    When they did find her it was clear right away that even if the police had went directly there and found her within minutes, it was still too late. She died in that fall. I’m fact she was dead before she hit the bottom as I recall it. Her poor little body falling into whatever kind of things are inside a huge silo like that. Stairs I imagine maybe. But I remember that made me a little less pissed. The response from 911 would have at best shortened the search. But it wasn’t going to save her. There is a true crime book called “LIke Father Like Son” where a cop tells the son a version of the story while trying to get him to confess about his and his fathers crimes. It’s an imteresting paragraph. But not exactly 100% factual.
    I remember being so frustrated and just DRIVEN by the 911 caller who couldn’t get the dispatcher to send units out because the dispatcher was unfamiliar with the area so had no idea. It’s like (was) RIGHT THERE. You can’t miss it. Right as you cross the river on the I80. You cross out of sac, into west sac, and yolo county and it was pretty much the first thing you saw. You couldn’t miss it. But this dispatcher had no idea. I remember when they tore them down. I actually went to watch it. I always hated them big dead things. And after that child died there it turned my stomach every time I seen them.
    I guess you guys probably understand how sometimes a tragic event can just haunt a person. Even one not closely involved. This has been my haunting. And i guess it’ll stay that way.
    But thank you for your reply!
    I was hella stoaked about it. I love you guys and the show. And I totally read that email in your voice! Awesome. Thanks.

  • Candace

    Candace Halifax

    Great job covering this difficult case. Love you two!

    Great job covering this difficult case. Love you two!

  • Ian

    Ian

    Hey fellas. Great episode as usual. This one is particularly annoying to me. I have trouble understanding this kind of crime, even moreso than heinous serial killers like, say, Bundy. So you beat a man almost to death, and killed three others for, what, maybe 20k? What the fuck? And on top of that these cretins get caught within minutes of leaving. I truly cannot understand. Get any shit job in the country and you'll make over 20k a yr doing almost nothing. Then you can get drunk with your piece of shit friends without hurting anyone. Fuck these two criminal dickweeds.

    Hey fellas. Great episode as usual. This one is particularly annoying to me. I have trouble understanding this kind of crime, even moreso than heinous serial killers like, say, Bundy. So you beat a man almost to death, and killed three others for, what, maybe 20k? What the fuck? And on top of that these cretins get caught within minutes of leaving. I truly cannot understand. Get any shit job in the country and you'll make over 20k a yr doing almost nothing. Then you can get drunk with your piece of shit friends without hurting anyone. Fuck these two criminal dickweeds.

  • Brian

    Brian Lexington ky

    What happened to this family was horrible. I think those guys went in with the intention of rape and murder. The one scumbag was attracted to the little girl at the store, he even made that comment about her. He is a child predator that went in the home to prey on a child. He probably intended to kill the father with the baseball bat in the sunroom. He hit him several times as hard as he could, he was trying to kill him in my opinion. You guys should do an episode on Alfred Wright. That would be an interesting episode.

    What happened to this family was horrible. I think those guys went in with the intention of rape and murder. The one scumbag was attracted to the little girl at the store, he even made that comment about her. He is a child predator that went in the home to prey on a child. He probably intended to kill the father with the baseball bat in the sunroom. He hit him several times as hard as he could, he was trying to kill him in my opinion.
    You guys should do an episode on Alfred Wright. That would be an interesting episode.

  • D

    D London, UK

    Agreed this is a horrific case. But as things to ponder go I think it is interesting, if hard to do, to consider a few things. First it's that this guy JK (at least) was indeed a victim himself. Being a victim doesn't mean one can't also be a perpetrator. As far as I know, once you're victimised to that level, your most likely options are two 1) becoming a victim or 2) becoming a perpetrator. It would take years and years (perhaps a lifetime) of therapy to break out of that pattern. Who pays for said therapy? Who even educates you that you should access it? If you've been living in an environment where extreme violence and crime is normal you probably don't even know you've got issues. Other things to consider, if one wants to understand why people get to commit this type of stuff are the foster care system and the halfway house system. Both are problematic. At least in the UK, the halfway house system is largely privatised, which means the house is interested in accepting clients even when they aren't prepared to deal with their needs, because they are getting paid to house said clients. A lot of them end up doing more harm than good. I don't know much about the foster care system so I'm not going to talk about it, but it's quite obvious that housing a number of kids with serious behavioural/emotional issues is going to be tough on the foster parents even when they are well intentioned and skilled. I would in fact be curious to know how much training they get in dealing with these serious issues. I'm not trying to blame the system, because in the end all of us choose our course of action and not everyone who's had a terrible life ends up a murderer. But we need to recognise the problems in the system which contribute to horrible things happening.

    Agreed this is a horrific case. But as things to ponder go I think it is interesting, if hard to do, to consider a few things. First it's that this guy JK (at least) was indeed a victim himself. Being a victim doesn't mean one can't also be a perpetrator. As far as I know, once you're victimised to that level, your most likely options are two 1) becoming a victim or 2) becoming a perpetrator. It would take years and years (perhaps a lifetime) of therapy to break out of that pattern. Who pays for said therapy? Who even educates you that you should access it? If you've been living in an environment where extreme violence and crime is normal you probably don't even know you've got issues. Other things to consider, if one wants to understand why people get to commit this type of stuff are the foster care system and the halfway house system. Both are problematic. At least in the UK, the halfway house system is largely privatised, which means the house is interested in accepting clients even when they aren't prepared to deal with their needs, because they are getting paid to house said clients. A lot of them end up doing more harm than good. I don't know much about the foster care system so I'm not going to talk about it, but it's quite obvious that housing a number of kids with serious behavioural/emotional issues is going to be tough on the foster parents even when they are well intentioned and skilled. I would in fact be curious to know how much training they get in dealing with these serious issues.

    I'm not trying to blame the system, because in the end all of us choose our course of action and not everyone who's had a terrible life ends up a murderer. But we need to recognise the problems in the system which contribute to horrible things happening.

  • Caroline

    Caroline Utica

    I was thinking about how stupid that Steven guy must have been since Jennifer could make that moneytransfer without her own and her husbands ID?! Like how did he think that went down? So many lives wasted for no reason and the cowards were pretty much known to the police the minute Jennifer put her foot in the bank.

    I was thinking about how stupid that Steven guy must have been since Jennifer could make that moneytransfer without her own and her husbands ID?! Like how did he think that went down? So many lives wasted for no reason and the cowards were pretty much known to the police the minute Jennifer put her foot in the bank.

  • Mark

    Mark Austin

    I discuss this incident in my Government class. In Connecticut you had a rather heated debate raging over whether the state should abolish the death penalty. The state legislature after a rather contentious battle, finally drafted a bill to in fact abolish it. Then you had a case that made statewide news for being probably the most horrific case in Connecticut history. The whole debate was restarted and the pro-capital punishment side had another card to play, which is why Governor M. Jodi Rell vetoed the bill. It seems that if there was ever a case that called for execution, this was it. Of course, the majority sentiment in the state was for abolishing the death penalty and it was just a matter of time. I think the Governor thought they could convict and execute these guys and then go ahead and abolish the death penalty later, which was terribly naive, considering how long appeals last for such a punishment. Eventually the bill passes and as such, all previous death sentences are commuted to life by Connecticut Supreme Court. Just a terribly depressing case. In the end, these three horrific murders were reduced to a political debate in which politicians lined up to court votes on the capital punishment issue. I live in Texas, and this kind of issue would have never been brought up, and each of these men would have had a needle put in their arm. As to the Captain's point about these guys not minding getting the death penalty, plenty say that when they know there are going to be years before it actually happens if it happens at all. But as that time grows close, those guys feel what that punishment is truly about, which is why they are placed on suicide watch, because they are trying to avoid that punishment. I have never bought any argument that life in prison is worse than capital punishment, it isn't and there are numerous cases of murderers that are more than happy to spend their days inside, hoping that maybe someday they get that pardon or parole. Capital punishment is a punishment that should be reserved for the most heinous crimes and this crime was just that. As for the actions of the police, hindsight is 20/20, I don't fault them.

    I discuss this incident in my Government class. In Connecticut you had a rather heated debate raging over whether the state should abolish the death penalty. The state legislature after a rather contentious battle, finally drafted a bill to in fact abolish it. Then you had a case that made statewide news for being probably the most horrific case in Connecticut history. The whole debate was restarted and the pro-capital punishment side had another card to play, which is why Governor M. Jodi Rell vetoed the bill. It seems that if there was ever a case that called for execution, this was it. Of course, the majority sentiment in the state was for abolishing the death penalty and it was just a matter of time. I think the Governor thought they could convict and execute these guys and then go ahead and abolish the death penalty later, which was terribly naive, considering how long appeals last for such a punishment. Eventually the bill passes and as such, all previous death sentences are commuted to life by Connecticut Supreme Court. Just a terribly depressing case. In the end, these three horrific murders were reduced to a political debate in which politicians lined up to court votes on the capital punishment issue. I live in Texas, and this kind of issue would have never been brought up, and each of these men would have had a needle put in their arm. As to the Captain's point about these guys not minding getting the death penalty, plenty say that when they know there are going to be years before it actually happens if it happens at all. But as that time grows close, those guys feel what that punishment is truly about, which is why they are placed on suicide watch, because they are trying to avoid that punishment. I have never bought any argument that life in prison is worse than capital punishment, it isn't and there are numerous cases of murderers that are more than happy to spend their days inside, hoping that maybe someday they get that pardon or parole. Capital punishment is a punishment that should be reserved for the most heinous crimes and this crime was just that. As for the actions of the police, hindsight is 20/20, I don't fault them.

  • ladyjocelyn

    ladyjocelyn

    I can't stop thinking about the horror that those girls had to go through.

    I can't stop thinking about the horror that those girls had to go through.

  • patricia

    patricia uk

    Thank you for all your hard work, believe me, I appreciate you, more than you will ever know.

    Thank you for all your hard work, believe me, I appreciate you, more than you will ever know.

  • amanda

    amanda Western Pennsylvania

    Hello, I'm a new listener and I've been binging on some of your most recent episodes and loving your show. I remember this case when it first happened, and hearing about it again with more details-- it's sick to think that human beings are capable of such evil.

    Hello,
    I'm a new listener and I've been binging on some of your most recent episodes and loving your show. I remember this case when it first happened, and hearing about it again with more details-- it's sick to think that human beings are capable of such evil.

  • Gina

    Gina Denver

    This type of case is exactly why I did not become a medical examiner. I already am overly protective of my kids! How incredibly horrific to live through this. I am not opposed to the death penalty only how much money is wasted on their case and appeals. I agree with both of you in this circumstance but by not allowing them to plead out, these fucking dick bag losers get the benefit of rights. Fuck them and I hope that they are each raped maliciously every single day for the rest of their days.

    This type of case is exactly why I did not become a medical examiner. I already am overly protective of my kids! How incredibly horrific to live through this.
    I am not opposed to the death penalty only how much money is wasted on their case and appeals. I agree with both of you in this circumstance but by not allowing them to plead out, these fucking dick bag losers get the benefit of rights. Fuck them and I hope that they are each raped maliciously every single day for the rest of their days.

  • Josh

    Josh MN

    This is one of those crimes that makes me regret the cruel and unusual punishment clause or at least it's interpretation. I believe that for truly depraved and heinous crimes like this one, pretty extreme forms of torture and death should not be unusual (though I guess they should be cruel). Make these people suffer for weeks/months. Solitary in a room with a bunch of rats and no where to sleep. Free swings of a baseball bat for bill if he wants. Whatever. This crime is really a whole other grade above the typical fare of even murders/rapes and there is not any doubt as to the perpetrators. Anyway, enjoy the show and really like how you two don't get to bogged down in conspiratorial nonsense which can be a problem for people interested in this sort of thing.

    This is one of those crimes that makes me regret the cruel and unusual punishment clause or at least it's interpretation. I believe that for truly depraved and heinous crimes like this one, pretty extreme forms of torture and death should not be unusual (though I guess they should be cruel). Make these people suffer for weeks/months. Solitary in a room with a bunch of rats and no where to sleep. Free swings of a baseball bat for bill if he wants. Whatever. This crime is really a whole other grade above the typical fare of even murders/rapes and there is not any doubt as to the perpetrators.

    Anyway, enjoy the show and really like how you two don't get to bogged down in conspiratorial nonsense which can be a problem for people interested in this sort of thing.

  • Leo

    Leo ND

    Death Penalty for each of those bastards.Not a 'Cruel' manner? BFS!!!

    Death Penalty for each of those bastards.Not a 'Cruel' manner? BFS!!!

  • DDM

    DDM NJ

    I am late to the episode though this case has fascinated/haunted me for years. First, I’ll have to re-watch the HBO doc to re-assess. However, I teach high school English and we are just reading In Cold Blood. Maybe we have Dick and Perry to thank for starting the home invasion trend and Capote for the romanticism of the murderer. Truman definitely manipulates his readers into feeling pity for at least one of the criminals. There are some similarities between Holcomb and Cheshire but bottom line, those guys went to the gallows. I see both sides of the capital punishment argument you raised. Between re-reading In Cold Blood and listening to this haunting podcast, I’m sufficiently spooked. Thanks. Great work.

    I am late to the episode though this case has fascinated/haunted me for years. First, I’ll have to re-watch the HBO doc to re-assess. However, I teach high school English and we are just reading In Cold Blood. Maybe we have Dick and Perry to thank for starting the home invasion trend and Capote for the romanticism of the murderer. Truman definitely manipulates his readers into feeling pity for at least one of the criminals. There are some similarities between Holcomb and Cheshire but bottom line, those guys went to the gallows. I see both sides of the capital punishment argument you raised. Between re-reading In Cold Blood and listening to this haunting podcast, I’m sufficiently spooked. Thanks. Great work.

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